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Money Stress Actually Makes You Look Older To Others, Study Finds

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People who worry about money were seen as looking up to 10 years older, study finds.

You’ve heard that money is the root of all evil, right? Now we can apply that adage to aging. A study just published in the Research on Aging journal found that people who worry about money actually look older than those who don’t stress about their finances. And they look a lot older ― as in 10 years older.

In the study, 200 people self-rated their levels of financial stress, and then photos were taken of them in 1994-1995 and again in 2004-2005. A panel was then asked to guess the ages of the people in the pictures. Across the board, reviewers found that the people who said they were under heavy financial stress had aged more.

As a side note: The study subjects who said they were under financial stress reported that they didn’t see themselves as looking older.

“What did surprise us was that financial stress was related just to how old you looked to others,” says Margie Lachman, a professor of psychology at Brandeis and one of the study’s authors, in a release. “It was not related to how old one feels or how old one thinks they look. So it showed up to others in one’s appearance, but not in terms of one’s own subjective views or perceptions of their age.”

So does worry and stress really age you? While we know that stress can be a killerand that money is one of those big-time stressors, Lachman speculated that stressed-out people may just be less likely to spend as much time on their appearance or healthy lifestyle choices. “Cosmetics or engaging in healthy practices for diet, exercise and sleep can affect how old one looks,” she said.

That said, stress has also been shown to accelerate aging on the cellular level, so it’s not just about a few more worry lines showing up. Chronic stress has been found to contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Unfortunately, even just anticipatory worrying comes with a downside. UC San Francisco researchers found that the mere anticipation of stress can increase an individual’s risk of age-related disorders.

So how about we all just take a “Don’t worry; be happy” moment today?

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Health & Lifestyle

DR Congo blame Unending Ebola Outbreak on Violence , Community Mistrust.

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DR Congo Ministry of Health spokesperson Jessica Ilunga has declared that violence and community mistrust have continued to hamper all efforts to control and end the fresh Ebola outbreak, which started Aug. 1.



Though according to the World Health Organization the number of new Ebola cases has dropped slightly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as there are 33% fewer cases to date in February compared with the same time period in December per STAT’s Helen Branswell, but some experts warn Axios that there remain signs that this outbreak is far from over.

Meanwhile, some experts warn that, that doesn’t mean the world’s second-largest Ebola outbreak on record is yet under control, and in fact it could simply be moving to new areas of the sprawling country.

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Johns Hopkins’ public health expert Jennifer Nuzzo maintains there are several reasons people should continue to view this outbreak as a cause for concern.

However, Nuzzo said Congo needs more than money from the international community and the U.S. in particular. Safety concerns have largely caused the CDC to limit its Ebola experts to the capital city of Kinshasa, where some have returned after being evacuated during an uptick in election-related violence, Nuzzo added that Now is the time for the U.S. to send them into the field.

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Health & Lifestyle

Sports head injuries Balanced reportage is required – Experts

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A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists, including Mark Herceg, PhD, a neuropsychologist at Northwell Health’s Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and a member of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, published a correspondence today in The Lancet Neurology, asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a type of dementia associated with exposure to repeated concussions, and has been linked with a variety of contact sports such as boxing, football, American football and rugby.



Although CTE is commonly featured in the news media and discussed among peers, the medical community is just beginning to understand how to recognize the disease, guidelines for how to assess its severity have yet to be established.

“We don’t currently have a clear understanding of the link between CTE pathology and any specific symptoms,” noted Dr. Herceg. “It’s important to note to the public at large that CTE is at an early stage of scientific and medical understanding, with many important aspects of the disease yet to be established.”

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“Dr. Herceg and his colleague’s CTE research is timely and impactful as a major step forward to more clearly defining the risk and prevalence of this important syndrome,” said Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute.

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-Northwell Health

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