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What you may gain from waking up earlier

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You could squeeze in some exercise

Not a morning person? To start waking up earlier, you don’t have to be—just quit snoozing, and keep moving! Going to the gym before the sun’s up is a great way to seize the day, and the habit can even boost your mood and productivity. For lifestyle blogger Jessica Booth, rising and shining created time for a morning yoga routine. ‘My session woke me up, gave me energy, and just generally made me feel more relaxed and less stressed,’ she wrote for bustle.com. Plus, getting your workout done earlier in the day can free up the evenings for any unexpected events or responsibilities that might pop up.

You could eat healthier

When you’re <a href='https://www.rd.com/home/cleaning-organizing/time-management-tips/1'>running late</a>, it might be tempting to grab a fast food burrito or give in to donut temptation on your way to the office. But all of those extra morning calories can add up fast. In a 2011 Northwestern University study, late sleepers consumed 248 more calories a day, twice as much fast food, and half as many fruits and veggies as early risers. The night owls also had a higher average BMI. Instead, use your extra hour in the morning to cook a healthy, <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/wellness/high-protein-breakfast-ideas/1'>high-protein breakfast</a> (say, of eggs, fruit, and whole wheat toast) to keep you feeling satisfied and curb your cravings all day long.

When you’re running late, it might be tempting to grab a fast food burrito or give in to donut temptation on your way to the office. But all of those extra morning calories can add up fast. In a 2011 Northwestern University study, late sleepers consumed 248 more calories a day, twice as much fast food, and half as many fruits and veggies as early risers. The night owls also had a higher average BMI. Instead, use your extra hour in the morning to cook a healthy, high-protein breakfast (say, of eggs, fruit, and whole wheat toast) to keep you feeling satisfied and curb your cravings all day long.

You could improve your mood

Waking up with the sun might give you a sunnier disposition, too! Studies have shown that early risers are happier and <a href="https://www.rd.com/culture/positive-quotes/1">more positive</a> than people who wake up late, agreeing more often with statements like 'I spend time identifying long-range goals for myself' and 'I feel in charge of making things happen.' Morning people have also reported feeling healthier, most likely because their internal clocks are aligned with the rising and setting of the sun. Here more <a href="https://www.rd.com/health/wellness/morning-person-advantages/1">health advantages of being a morning person</a>.

Waking up with the sun might give you a sunnier disposition, too! Studies have shown that early risers are happier and more positive than people who wake up late, agreeing more often with statements like ‘I spend time identifying long-range goals for myself’ and ‘I feel in charge of making things happen.’ Morning people have also reported feeling healthier, most likely because their internal clocks are aligned with the rising and setting of the sun.

You could feel less anxious

A late start to the morning could spell disaster for the rest of your day, leaving you rushing around with a million thoughts running through your head. Instead, use the quiet, peaceful time in the morning to make a to-do list or record your thoughts in a journal. Doing so can calm your mind and prepare you for the day ahead. Meditation can also give you a mental boost for the rest of the day; studies have found that meditating can help ease anxiety, improve reasoning skills, and maintain strong relationships. These tricks can help <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/conditions/natural-treatments-anxiety/1'>treat your anxiety naturally</a>.

A late start to the morning could spell disaster for the rest of your day, leaving you rushing around with a million thoughts running through your head. Instead, use the quiet, peaceful time in the morning to make a to-do list or record your thoughts in a journal. Doing so can calm your mind and prepare you for the day ahead. Meditation can also give you a mental boost for the rest of the day; studies have found that meditating can help ease anxiety, improve reasoning skills, and maintain strong relationships. These tricks can help treat your anxiety naturally.

You could look more put together

Not only could waking up earlier make you feel better, but it could help you look better, too. An extra hour in the morning means you can spend more time on the little things: ironing a shirt, fixing your hair, clipping your nails, etc. Plus, research has shown that appearing more put together has huge professional perks; in a 2013 study, 80 percent of respondents said that job candidates’ attire and appearance had a 'great impact' on their likelihood of being hired. Here are the style secrets of <a href="https://www.rd.com/health/beauty/easy-fashion-ideas/1">women who always look put together</a>.

Not only could waking up earlier make you feel better, but it could help you look better, too. An extra hour in the morning means you can spend more time on the little things: ironing a shirt, fixing your hair, clipping your nails, etc. Plus, research has shown that appearing more put together has huge professional perks; in a 2013 study, 80 percent of respondents said that job candidates’ attire and appearance had a ‘great impact’ on their likelihood of being hired. Here are the style secrets of women who always look put together.

You could be more productive

No coworkers? No problem. A quiet morning at your cubicle creates an uninterrupted period of productivity. Without the cacophony of meetings, emails, and conversations buzzing around the office, you can get a head start on the day before anyone else steps foot in the door. Here’s how to be more <a href='https://www.rd.com/advice/work-career/productive-first-hour-work/1'>productive in your first hour of work</a>.

No coworkers? No problem. A quiet morning at your cubicle creates an uninterrupted period of productivity. Without the cacophony of meetings, emails, and conversations buzzing around the office, you can get a head start on the day before anyone else steps foot in the door. Here’s how to be more productive in your first hour of work.

You could avoid the crowds

Getting caught in rush hour traffic can ruin your day before you even sit down at your desk. Instead, leave your house an hour earlier to avoid the congestion and snag a more convenient parking spot at work. (Try these mental tricks to <a href='https://www.rd.com/advice/travel/driving-stress/1'>make your commute go by faster</a>.) And if you have a little extra time, you can even treat yourself to a latte or cappuccino on your way in.

Getting caught in rush hour traffic can ruin your day before you even sit down at your desk. Instead, leave your house an hour earlier to avoid the congestion and snag a more convenient parking spot at work. (Try these mental tricks to make your commute go by faster.) And if you have a little extra time, you can even treat yourself to a latte or cappuccino on your way in.

24 Hours Across Africa

Zimbawe’s doctor goes missing after masterminding strike

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Fearless Zimbabwe’s minister of health has called on the government to address insecurity lapses that has lead to the disappearance Peter Magombeyi, the head of a doctor’s union, who disappeared on Saturday.

Fears are rising over the fate of Zimbabwe medical doctor Dr Peter Magombeyi after he sent a message to say he had been abducted in that country by unknown persons – apparently for demanding a “living wage”.

An AFP report earlier on Sunday quoted the Zimbabwe Hospital Doctor’s Association (ZHDA) as saying Magombeyi had not been heard from since he sent a WhatsApp message on Saturday night saying he had been “kidnapped by three men”.

Zimbabwe doctors, who earn a miserly equivalent of about R3 000 are on strike to press for better wages, equipment and medicines in state hospitals.

The ZHDA has reportedly accused state security forces of abducting the doctor because of his role in organising work stoppages.

This week some doctors said the death of deposed Robert Mugabe, 95, in a Singapore hospital on 6 September was an indication of how bad health services in Zimbabwe

“Dr Magombeyi’s crime is only to ask for a living wage for his profession. This is a reflection of the troubles born out of refusal to implement Political Reforms.”

The Zimbabwe government led by Emmerson Mnangagwa has not publicly commented on the doctor’s disappearance

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24 Hours Across Africa

Turkey: Group calls for immediate action against Femicide

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Emine Dirican, a beautician from Istanbul, tried to be a good wife. But her husband hated that she worked, that she socialized, even that she wanted to leave the house sometimes without him.

She tried to reason with him. He lashed out.

“One time, he tied me — my hands, my legs from the back, like you do to animals,” recalls Dirican, shuddering. “He beat me with a belt and said, ‘You’re going to listen to me, you’re going to obey whatever I say to you.’ “

She left him and moved in with her parents. In January, he showed up, full of remorse and insisting he had changed. She let him in.

In her mother’s kitchen, he grabbed her by the hair, threw her to the floor and pulled out a gun.

“He shot me,” she says. “Then he went back to my mom and he pulled the trigger again, but the gun was stuck. So he hit her head with the back of the gun.”

Her father, who was in another room in the house, heard the gunshots and ran over. Dirican almost bled to death after a bullet ripped through a main artery in one of her legs.

“I was telling my father, ‘Daddy, please, I don’t want to die.’ “

Femicide — killing women because of their gender — is a longstanding issue in Turkey. Nearly 300 women have been killed so far this year, according to the Istanbul-based advocacy group We Will Stop Femicide, which has been tracking gender-related deaths since Turkish authorities stopped doing so in 2009.

Source Npr news

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