page contents
Connect with us

News

EU court rules workplace headscarf ban legal

Published

on

European companies can ban employees from wearing religious or political symbols including the Islamic headscarf, the EU’s top court ruled on Tuesday in a landmark case.

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) said it does not constitute “direct discrimination” if a firm has an internal rule banning the wearing of “any political, philosophical or religious sign”.

The Luxembourg-based court was ruling on the case of a Muslim woman fired by the security company G4S in Belgium after she insisted on wearing a headscarf.

The wearing of religious symbols, and especially Islamic symbols such as the headscarf, has become a hot button issue with the rise of populist sentiment across Europe, with some countries such as Austria considering a complete ban on the full-face veil in public.

Manfred Weber, head of the centre-right European People’s Party, the biggest in the European Parliament, welcomed the ruling.

“Important ruling by the European Court of Justice: employers have the right to ban the Islamic veil at work. European values must apply in public life,” Weber said in a tweet.

The ECJ was ruling on a case dating to 2003 when Samira Achbita, a Muslim, was employed as a receptionist by G4S security services in Belgium.

At the time, the company had an “unwritten rule” that employees should not wear any political, religious or philosophical symbols at work, the ECJ said.

In 2006, Achbita told G4S she wanted to wear the Islamic headscarf at work but was told this would not be allowed.

Subsequently, the company introduced a formal ban. Achbita was dismissed and she went to court claiming discrimination.

The ECJ said European Union law does bar discrimination on religious grounds, but G4S’s actions were based on treating all employees the same, meaning no one person was singled out for application of the ban.

“The rule thus treats all employees of the undertaking in the same way, notably by requiring them, generally and without any differentiation, to dress neutrally,” the ECJ said.

“Accordingly, such an internal rule does not introduce a difference of treatment that is directly based on religion or belief,” it said.

However, in a related case in France, the ECJ ruled that a customer could not demand that a company employee not wear the Islamic headscarf when conducting business with them on its behalf.

Design engineer Asma Bougnaoui was employed full-time by Micropole, a private company, in 2008, having been told that wearing the headscarf might cause problems with clients.

Following a customer complaint, Micropole asked Bougnaoui not to wear the headscarf on the grounds employees should be dressed neutrally.

She was subsequently dismissed and went to court claiming discrimination.

The ECJ said the case turned on whether there was an internal company rule in place applicable to all, as in the G4S instance, or whether the client’s demand meant Bougnaoui was treated differently.

The ECJ concluded that Bougnaoui had indeed been treated differently and so the client’s demand that she not wear a headscarf “cannot be considered a genuine and determining occupational requirement”.

News

Thailand pick March 24 for first general election

Published

on

Thailand Election Commission has confirmed its readiness to carryout their first election on March 24, chairman Ittiporn Boonprakong told the  newsmen.



The commission admitted that the elections would have been held on Feb. 24, but the military government expressed concern that election-related events would clash with early preparations for the coronation of King Maha Vajiralongkorn, scheduled for May 4-6.

IMG-20180912-WA0030

In a statement, the Office of the Prime Minister said it would be inappropriate for election events to “unnecessarily coincide with the scheduling of the Coronation Ceremony.

The junta has pushed back the election several times for various reasons after overthrowing the democratically elected government of former prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra in 2014,

FOLLOW US ON:
 INSTAGRAMLINKEDINYOUTUBETWITTER & FACEBOOK

duo the delay has lead to street protests for months, but he said that there is need for everybody to maintain peace in-order to protect the image of  country.

TO DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE NEWS APP CLICK HERE
WATCH RUSSIA 2018 HIGHLIGHTS HERE

 

Continue Reading

Motherland News

Former communication minister arrested over corruption in Ethiopia.

Published

on

Ethiopia’s former Communication Minister, Bereket Simon, has been arrested by the federal government at his residence in the capital, Addis Ababa, multiple news sources, state and private, have reported.



Simon is also a founding member of the ruling coalition, the Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Democratic Front, EPRDF. Multiple local mdia channels are reporting that his arrest is in connection with corruption.

IMG-20180912-WA0030

Another arrested official is Tadesse Kassa, a former top civil servant. Simon was a member of the Amhara regional bloc in the EPRDF.

FOLLOW US ON:
 INSTAGRAMLINKEDINYOUTUBETWITTER & FACEBOOK

His party, now the Amhara Democratic Party ousted him from executive committee membership.

Bereket resigned his position in government in October 2017 at the time as an advisor in charge of Policy Studies and Research to ex Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn.

TO DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE NEWS APP CLICK HERE
WATCH RUSSIA 2018 HIGHLIGHTS HERE

Continue Reading

Facebook

Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2018 Anttention Media. All rights reserved