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How to Make Your Own Ghee

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Have you ever tasted butter’s richly golden cousin, ghee? If not, get ready to have your socks knocked off. If you are familiar with ghee, you know it is delicious, but can be pretty expensive. Why not save a few bucks by making your own? It’s fast, easy, healthy, and even tastier than store-bought.

Ghee, or clarified butter, is essentially butter oil—butter with the milk solids (ahem, the allergenic proteins) removed. This nutty, buttery fat is shelf-stable and can easily be refrigerated or kept at room temperature. Originating in India (where shelf-stable butter is necessary to counter the oppressive heat), ghee is often used as a nourishing fat in Ayurvedic cooking.

Ghee has a very high smoke point, making it a smart choice for cooking if you are looking to avoid inflammatory oxidation. It is also loaded with vitamins A and E, as you can imagine due to its rich golden hue. It also contains the elusive vitamin K2 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which helps to regulate metabolism and support a healthy weight. Ghee is known to fight inflammation and may actually lower cholesterol (although I assume that is entirely dependent on the quality of butter used in the ghee). And due to the clarification process, ghee is extremely low in dairy allergens lactose and casein, meaning those who live dairy-free may actually be able to enjoy butter again!

Ready to hop onboard and make some of your own ghee? All you need is one pound of unsalted butter (preferably grass-fed) and some cheesecloth.

How to Make Your Own Ghee

Ingredients

1 lb. of unsalted butter (preferably grass-fed)

3 layers of cheesecloth

Instructions

Melt the butter in a saucepan over low heat.

Simmer the butter until it begins to bubble. You’ll see the solids begin sticking to the side of the pan after a few minutes.

The butter will begin to foam with smaller bubbles and the milk solids will begin to brown.

After 8-10 minutes of simmering, the milk solids will turn deep brown and sink to the bottom while the remaining butter will become gloriously golden. Remove from heat.

Strain liquid through triple-layer cheesecloth over a heat-proof container.

Toss solids trapped in cheesecloth.

Store liquid butter (now officially ghee) in an airtight jar. Refrigerate or store at room temperature, depending on your preferences.

The entire process takes no more than 15 minutes from start to finish and you have a nice, nourishing jar of grass-fed ghee at the end. Spread on bread, use for cooking, stir into coffee and tea, you name it. Ghee is a wonderful fat that supports a healthy body and a healthy mind.

Food & Cuisine

UN FAO: Food prices jump in January.

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Food prices rose in January, and has become stronger for vegetable oils and sugar, the United Nations food agency said on Thursday.

The Food and Agriculture Organisation’s food price index, which measures monthly changes for a basket of cereals, oilseeds, dairy products, meat and sugar, averaged 164.8 points last month against 161.8 in December.

In spite of the rise, the index was still 2.2 per cent below its January 2018 level.



The FAO dairy price index jumped 7.2 per cent from December’s value, ending seven months of declines.

FAO said limited export supplies from Europe, caused by strong internal demand, was the main driving force behind the increase.

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FAO’s vegetable oil price index rose 4.3 per cent from the previous month, while its sugar index rose 1.3 per cent and its cereal index made marginal gains on December.

The meat price index was largely unchanged.

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FAO lifted its latest world cereal production forecast for 2018 to 2.611 billion tonnes, slightly higher than the December reading, reflecting upward revisions for maize, wheat and rice.

“Much of the projected growth is associated with expected increases in Europe, where beneficial weather has so far shored up yield prospects while also sowings are forecast to expand, largely driven by attractive prices,” FAO said.

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Food & Cuisine

Cells that could prevent obesity, diabetes, hypertension found by American scientists.

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An American scientists has discovered a group of cells in the small intestine that slows down metabolism and increase fat accumulation.

The study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature  may lend a clue to prevent and treat obesity, diabetes and hypertension.



Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital in the US found that mice lacking those cells called intraepithelial T lymphocytes or natural IELs could burn fat and sugar without gaining weight.

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When those cells are present, they suppress a hormone that speeds up metabolism and conserves more energy it gets from food.

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Such a mechanism used to be an evolutionary advantage when food was scarce in ancient time, but “with the food so abundant,this energy-saving mechanism can backfire and lead to unhealthy outcomes,” said the paper’s lead researcher Filip Swirski from Massachusetts General Hospital.

Swirski’s study can eventually contribute to cardiovascular disease and other metabolic ailments.

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