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See what eating late at night could do to your body

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It’s time to kick the habit of late night snacking after new research suggests it could lead to a potentially deadly condition. Eating late at night increases your risk of heart disease and diabetes because it raises levels of harmful blood fats.

Shift work, in particular, is triggering the illnesses because people are eating their main meals at the wrong time of the day, scientists have discovered.

Jetlag, or simply staying up late, is also leading to dangerous midnight feasts.

The new research involved testing rats by feeding them at different times of the day.

This is what eating late at night does to your body

It found that when the animals ate at the start of their rest period there was a dramatic spike in blood fats, compared to if they were fed just before they became active.

The blood fats – called triglycerides – are produced in the liver and come from meat, dairy products and cooking oils. They can clog arteries and imflame the pancreas, leading to heart disease or diabetes.

The latest findings, published in the journal Experimental Physiology, suggested the body’s 24 hour cycle is to blame.

This is what eating late at night does to your body

Dr Ruud Buijs, one of the authors of the journal, said: ‘The fact we can ignore our biological clock is important for survival.

‘We can decide to sleep during the day when we are extremely tired, or we run away from danger at night.

‘However, doing this frequently – with shift work, jet lag, or staying up late at night – will harm our health in the long term especially when we eat at times when we should sleep.’

In the last decade studies have documented triglycerides can cause strokes and heart attacks.

Dr Buijs said: ‘Studies show that night workers, who have activity and meal patterns shifted towards the night have an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases.’

According to a 2013 study, people who ate early in the day lost approximately 12 percent of their body weight, while late eaters lost only 8 percent, even though they all followed the same diet and exercise regime.

 

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Food & Cuisine

Easy Desserts You Can Make In Few Minutes

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For those who look forward to dessert after dinner every single night, you need these recipes in your life.

There are options here for everyone — healthy, gluten free, vegan — but the recurring theme is ‘no-bake and quick’ because ain’t nobody got time for baking and faffing about when your favourite TV show is ongoing. 

From peanut butter brownie bars and banana split smoothie, to easy fudge and chocolate s’mores mug cake, here are some easy, delicious desserts for all us feeling lazy after a busy day.

  • EASY SALTED OAT FUDGE 

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This delicious fudge recipe is healthier than most and lighter, too, thanks to oat flour! It tastes like a cross between fudge and no-bake cookies. Feel free to play with the mix-ins to suit your preferences.

INGREDIENTS

  • ¾ cup creamy unsalted almond butter or peanut butter
  • ¾ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • ⅓ cup maple syrup or honey
  • 4 tablespoons butter, sliced into small cubes, or ¼ cup melted coconut oil
  • ¾ teaspoon salt (scale back, to taste, if your nut butter is salted)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 ¾ cups oats ground into flour, see step 1
  • 1 cup whole pecans or other nuts
  • Optional: Flaky sea salt, for sprinkling on top
  1. Prep work: Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Cut two strips of parchment paper to fit across the interior of an 8 to 9-inch square baker. Criss-cross the papers at the bottom of the baker and fold the ends up the sides of the baker (see photos). If you need to make your own oat flour, blend 1 and ¾ cups oats in a blender or food processor until ground into a fine flour.
  2. Toast the nuts: Arrange the nuts in a single layer on a small, rimmed baking sheet (I used parchment paper for easy clean-up). Bake for 7 to 10 minutes, until fragrant (7 minutes for thinner/smaller/chopped nuts and about 10 for whole pecans). If you’re using large nuts like pecans, transfer them to a cutting board and chop them into small pieces with a chef’s knife.
  3. Make the fudge: In a medium-sized, heavy-bottomed pot, combine the nut butter, chocolate chips, sweetener, butter, salt and cinnamon. Warm the pot over medium heat, stirring often, until the mixture is melted throughout. Remove the pot from heat.
  4. Stir the vanilla extract into the pot, followed by the oat flour and finally, the chopped pecans. The mixture will have thickened up at this point, so you might have to put some muscle into it to mix in those pecans. You can do it!
  5. Carefully dump the fudge mixture into your lined square baker. Use the back of a sturdy mixing spoon to push the mixture across the baker so it’s roughly evenly distributed. Cover the bottom side of a thick, heavy-bottomed drinking glass or mason jar with parchment paper and press it down on the fudge repeatedly until the fudge is evenly packed. If you’re finishing the fudge with flaky sea salt, lightly sprinkle some on top now and gently press it into place with the bottom of your parchment-covered glass.
  6. Cover and freeze the fudge for 30 to 45 minutes, until it’s firm to the touch and no longer shiny in the middle. If you’re not in a hurry, you can refrigerate the fudge for a couple of hours or longer.
  7. Use a chef’s knife to slice the fudge into 1 ¼-inch wide columns and rows. Fudge will keep well for a couple of days at room temperature, or for a few weeks in the freezer, sealed in an air-tight freezer bag.

Note: MAKE IT DAIRY FREE AND VEGAN: Use dairy-free chocolate chips and coconut oil in place of the butter.

MAKE IT GLUTEN FREE: Use certified gluten-free oat flour or oats.

2. Two-layer no-bake peanut butter brownie bars

If you’re equally obsessed with peanut butter and brownies, try these no-bake dessert bars with a brownie crust and a peanut butter top. This treat is considered more healthy than your regular brownie.

2-Layer-PB-Brownie-Bars

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Ingredients

Brownie Layer

  • 1 cup raw walnuts
  • 1/2 cup raw almonds
  • ~ 1 cup dates, pitted (medjool or deglet noor)
  • 1/4 cup semisweet or dark chocolate chips (non-dairy for vegan)
  • 1/2 cup + 1 Tbsps unsweetened cocoa or raw cacao powder
  • pinch sea salt

Peanut Butter Layer

  • 1/2 cup pitted dates
  • 1/2 cup raw almonds
  • 1 cup roasted salted peanuts (if unsalted, add salt to taste)
  • 1/2 cup natural salted peanut butter (if unsalted, add salt to taste)

Instructions

  1. To make the brownie layer, pulse dates in the food processor until small bits remain. Remove from processor and set aside in a small bowl. Add walnuts, almonds, chocolate chips and cocoa powder in the processor and pulse until well combined. Then, while the processor is running, drop small bits of the dates in until a dough is formed. It should begin to ball up at some point. If it remains too dry, add a couple more whole (pitted) dates until a dough is achieved.
  2. Press into an 8×8 pan (or one of similar size) lined with parchment or plastic wrap. This makes it easier to lift out and cut.
  3. Press until flat using your hands or a spatula. Pop in the freezer.
  4. To make peanut butter layer, process dates until small bits remain. Remove and set aside in a bowl. Then add raw almonds and peanuts and pulse until small bits remain. Add back in peanut butter and the dates and process until well combined. Press on top of brownie layer until smooth. Using plastic wrap or parchment can help get it completely flat.
  5. Freeze for at least 15 minutes before removing from pan and cutting. Cut into about 20 squares (I cut mine too big and would prefer smaller bites). Store in an airtight container to keep fresh. I keep mine in the freezer so they stay fresh for weeks.

Notes

*Nutrition information is a rough estimate for 1 bar

Nutrition Per Serving (1 of 20)

  • Calories: 204
  • Fat: 13g
  • Sodium: 80mg
  • Carbohydrates: 17g
  • Fiber: 3.5g
  • Sugar: 10g
  • Protein: 6.8g

3. Five-minute chocolate fudge s’mores mug cake

If you find mug cakes a bit plain, give this recipe a go — imagine a biscuit base, rich chocolate fudge cake filling and a golden marshmallow topping. And you can make it in under five minutes.

smoresmug-1

  • 2-3 tablespoons graham cracker crumbs
  • 3 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (mine was dark cocoa, hence the dark color)
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 1/2 ounces milk chocolate (chopped or morsels)
  • marshmallow fluff, cream or actual marshmallows

Instructions

  1. Combine 3 tablespoons butter and 1 ounce of chocolate in a small bowl, then melt in the microwave for 20-30 seconds. Set aside.
  2. In another bowl, combine remaining melted butter with 2-3 tablespoons of graham cracker crumbs and stir until moistened. Press graham crumbs into the bottom of your mug.
  3. In a bowl. whisk egg, sugar and vanilla until smooth. Add in flour, baking powder, salt and cocoa, stir until a thick batter forms. Stream in melted butter and chocolate, mixing to combine. Fold in remaining chocolate chips. Add half of the mixture on top of the graham crust, then throw on a scoop of marshmallow fluff/cream or a few marshmallows. Add remaining batter on top, then pop in the microwave for 1 minute and 20 seconds to almost 2 minutes.
  4. Remove and top with additional marshmallow if desired. You can pop it back in the microwave for 5-10 seconds to make them melty, or pop them directly under the broiler for about 10 seconds to toast if desired. You can also use a kitchen torch if you have one. Sprinkle with graham crumbs!

Notes

If you don’t have whole wheat pastry flour, you can use all-purpose. I would not recommend using regular whole wheat. Additionally, I have made this by substituting coconut butter for the full amount of butter. It was just as delicious, albeit slightly drier. You cannot taste coconut at all. Finally, take into account the power of your microwave. Mine has a mind of it’s own and is insanely powerful, so I cooked this on 80% power. Judge accordingly and add/subtract a few minutes of cooking if you know your’s is wonky too.

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4. Three-ingredient no-churn chocolate ice cream

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Keen for ice cream? This healthy version uses frozen bananas, almond butter and cacao powder to create a smooth, creamy and sweet ice cream — without dairy or refined sugar.

Ingredients

  • 2-3 medium bananas, frozen and chopped
  • 1-2 tbsp almond butter can substitute for any nut or seed butter
  • 1-2 tbsp cocoa powder

Instructions

For the soft serve ice cream version-

  1. In a high-speed blender or food processor, add your frozen bananas and blend for 10 seconds to lightly break apart. Add your almond butter and cocoa powder and blend until just blended. Transfer to a bowl and enjoy soft serve style. 

    For the hard scoop ice cream version-

    1. Place a small loaf pan in the freezer.

    2. In a high-speed blender or food processor, add your frozen bananas and blend for 10 seconds to lightly break apart. Add your almond butter and cocoa powder and blend until all ingredients are just blended. 
    3. Transfer chocolate ice cream to the loaf pan. To ensure it doesn’t become too icy, lightly mix your ice cream ever 20-30 minutes for the first hour.

    4. Thaw for 10-15 minutes before eating. Lightly wet an ice cream scoop before scooping the ice cream into a bowl.   

      Note

      For a sweeter ice cream, feel free to add 1 tablespoon of maple syrup, agave nectar or coconut syrup.

      3-ingredient-no-churn-blender-chocolate-ice-cream5

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Food & Cuisine

Foods that will have your Vagina thanking You!

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Women struggle with Vaginal health at some point in their life and statistics show that at least 75% of women get at least one yeast infection during their lifetime. It is important to note that what we eat also has an effect on the vagina and vaginal health therefore, the key to improving your intimate well-being lies in what you put on your plate.

Below is a list of some common foods that will help you strengthen and preserve your vaginal health:

Natural yoghurt and other probiotics

Probiotics (good bacteria) help maintain vaginal PH and ward off yeast infections and keep your gut healthy. Probiotics can be found in fermented foods like natural yoghurt, sauerkrauts, kefir and miso.

Cranberry juice

Cranberries prevent and relive symptoms of urinary tract infections by acidifying the urine and balancing the PH of the vaginal area. They contain strong acidic compounds which don’t get broken down during digestion making them able to fight bacteria that cause the infections. To benefit fully from cranberries it would be best to eat fresh cranberries by mixing them in natural yoghurt.

Fresh fruit and vegetables

As usual, fruits and vegetables make your overall health better as they contain certain vitamins and minerals essential for your well-being. For instance, Vitamin C will help boost your immune system. Avocados for instance stimulate vaginal health as they contain Vitamin B6 and potassium which support healthy vaginal walls. Green, leafy vegetables on the other hand help with blood circulation and prevent vaginal dryness.

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Seeds and nuts

Sunflower seeds, almonds, walnuts and hazelnuts all contain vitamin E and oils which help prevent vaginal dryness. Almond and pumpkin seeds are rich in Zinc which is an essential mineral that regulates the menstrual cycle and helps combat itching and other symptoms of dryness. Flaxseeds are rich in phytoestrogens and omega 3 fatty acids which help to boost estrogen levels and stop vaginal dryness.

Water

For vaginal mucous membrane to function properly, they require plenty of water in order to stay well hydrated and what better way to achieve this than by drinking plenty of water? Drinking sufficient amounts of water will ensure that your vagina stays lubricated as well as diminish foul smells from your lovely lady parts.

Garlic

Garlic, eaten raw contains major antimicrobial and antifungal properties. In case of a yeast infection, these properties contained in garlic effectively kill yeast and could also soothe the symptoms of the infection including soreness and itchiness and would best work if the raw, peeled garlic is used as a suppository and left overnight.

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