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THE FIRST MAN IN THE WORLD TO GIVE BIRTH SHOWS OFF HIS BABY

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Thomas Beatie says he is just like any other normal father. But he is about as far as you could be from typical. He claims to have given birth to the child.

Although born a woman, Beatie had his breasts removed and lives outwardly as a man after changing his gender to male.

The 34-year-old says he retained his female sex organs because he intended to have children one day.

He conceived with sperm from a donor and was inseminated at home by his 45-year-old wife Nancy, using a do-it-yourself kit.

Despite opposition from family, friends and the medical profession he continued with the controversial pregnancy and says that on June 29 he delivered Susan Juliette.
Yesterday Beatie, from Bend, in Oregon, spoke for the first time about the 40-hour labour, describing it as the ‘experience of a lifetime’.

He said: ‘It was simply amazing and beautiful and is a moment I will cherish for the rest of my life.

‘Everyone thought I was going to have a caesarean but I always knew I wanted a natural birth and I had one.

‘I could hear her words but I needed to see her for myself. And then she came out and my eyes just filled with tears. She was so beautiful and perfect in every way. I was overwhelmed with love and wonder and I couldn’t keep my eyes off her. I still can’t today.’

He also claimed that his daughter is fed naturally by his wife who has begun to produce milk after being stimulated by the suckling baby.

He said: ‘Most people assumed that our baby would not be breast-fed but we are proud to announce that she is.

‘Nancy breast-feeds her every two to three hours. I do everything but breast-feed her.’

Beatie, who was born in Hawaii as Tracy Lagondino, had a partial sex change operation ten years ago and married soon after.

He told the News of the World: ‘We see ourselves as a traditional family – husband, wife and child. Nancy and I have strong family values and will raise Susan with integrity, compassion and respect for all people.

‘Like any proud dad I look forward to being a huge part of my daughter’s life. I can’t wait to watch her and Nancy bake cookies and cupcakes together.

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Health & Lifestyle

Cote d’Ivoire: Destroying the Killer Rice

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Authorities in Cote d’Ivoire have destroyed 18,000 tonnes of rice declared to be unfit for human consumption.

This follows tests carried out by the country’s consumer association which had demanded the government to do so after the cargo from Myanmar had been refused entry in Togo, Guinea and Ghana over quality issues.

The national and international quality control tests revealed the unfit nature of the rice.

It should be noted that most African countries depend on imports because local farmers are unable to meet the ever rising demands.

Source: Africanews

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Mali: Donkeys deliver vaccines as diseases spike with violence

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Reuters DAKAR –

With spiraling ethnic violence exposing more children in Mali to fatal diseases, health workers are using donkeys and boats to deliver life-saving vaccines, charities said on Wednesday.

In the central Mopti region – where 157 people died in one attack last month – suspected measles cases rose five-fold in one year to 98 in 2018, U.N. children’s agency UNICEF said, due to a four-fold jump in unvaccinated children to 70,000.

Motorcycles, which health workers used to reach remote villages, have been banned to reduce militant activity, forcing them to use traditional means like horses, it said.

“The problem of vaccination is directly linked to the current conflict,” said Patrick Irenge, medical coordinator for the charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), which is using cars and boats as mobile clinics to reach cut off communities.

“If there is a lull in the violence, a small window that opens, we organize a vaccination campaign.”

Last month’s massacre was the deadliest to date in a conflict between Dogon hunters and Fulani herders which has displaced tens of thousands of civilians in the West African country since it escalated last year.

Pneumonia is one of the top killers of children in Mali and it can be prevented with vaccines – as can measles – but it is too dangerous for many parents to venture out with children.

“Transport is difficult because we don’t have the means to rent a vehicle or a horse cart,” said Aissata Barry, a 34-year-old mother in the village of Kankelena, about 4 km (2.5 miles) from the nearest health center in the town of Sofara.

“There are rapists on the road. That’s what we’re afraid of,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone, adding that one of her neighbors was raped two weeks ago.

Mamadou Kasse, a local health worker who vaccinated Barry’s children, said the number of children he can reach each day has fallen since he swapped his motorbike for an eight-hour ride in a donkey cart with a cooler full of vaccines.

Reporting by Nellie Peyton; Editing by Katy Migiro. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, property rights, and climate change. Visit news.trust.org

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