Connect with us

Motherland News

Couple whose baby died when it was born prematurely on honeymoon buried him in clothes made from wedding dress.

Published

on

Share With Friends:

A heartbroken couple’s honeymoon was tragically cut short when their baby boy died after being born prematurely.

Little Nathan John came into the world when his mum, Vicky, was 23 weeks pregnant and celebrating her marriage to James Waite in Menorca.

He was just an hour old when he died at a hospital on the island, and they were denied the chance to take photos of him.

Instead, the only record he ever lived they have are his tiny foot and handprints.

The couple, who married in March, were told by Spanish doctors that as Vicky’s pregnancy had not reached 24 weeks, and because Nathan lived for less than 24 hours, no birth or death certificates would be issued.

The registry office in Leeds was unable to help as Nathan was born in Menorca.

Desperate to honour Nathan’s memory, Vicky and Jamie, who were on holiday with their son, Jamie Luke, are now saving to buy him a headstone for his burial plot.

Family and friends have rallied round to help raise part of the £4,000 needed to buy the memorial stone.

Vicky reoprt: “We honeymooned as a family in Cala’n Forcat, Menorca. We flew out on Friday May 19 – it was just a week’s break, we went with a family we are very close to.

“Four days into the holiday I woke up to bleeding and I felt very uncomfortable – this was at 9am.

“We called the doctor out from reception and he rushed me into hospital and said my baby was coming now and there was no time to fly me out to mainland Majorca.

“They wheeled me into a room and said they said they would give me something to help me relax – this was at 12.05pm.

“The next thing I know it was 1.05pm and I was just coming round – they had put me to sleep.

“I was told my baby boy had been born and was still alive but would not live for long. My husband

wasn’t with me at this point, he wasn’t allowed in the room.”

“Ten minutes later, the doctor came back and said my little boy had died, and asked if I wanted to see him for a minute.

“My husband came back in the room at this point and Nathan John was passed to me, wrapped in tissue. We cried as we held him; my head was all over the place and I didn’t really know was happening.

“It was all very quick and I was still high as a kite from the drugs they gave me.

“Before we could even think about photos or anything they came back and took him away from us.”

Jamie and Vicky’s son Jamie Luke, three, was being looked after by friends that had travelled with the honeymooners, and Vicky was told she would be kept at the hospital overnight.

At around 6pm, just six hours after Nathan’s premature birth, Jamie had to leave to care for their son and Vicky was left alone in hospital.

“We just cried for hours and had to tell our family back home,” Vicky said.

“I asked if I could see Nathan again and they wouldn’t let me – they said he had been moved to the mortuary already.

“It was all really hard to understand with the language barrier, the translation wasn’t very good. I was left for the night then discharged the next morning.”

Vicky and Jamie, of Cottingley, returned to Leeds on May 26 – Nathan’s body was flown home on June 2.

They went to the registry office in Leeds to try and secure birth/death certificates, but were told they could not be issued as Nathan was born abroad.

The grieving couple were allowed to arrange a burial for their son at Cottingley Crematorium in June – held just three days before their eldest son, Jamie Luke’s third birthday.

Vicky was told aged 23 she would not be able to have children naturally and had suffered four miscarriages before falling pregnant with her eldest son, Jamie Luke, aged 33.

Vicky said: “It was one of the hardest things I have ever had to do – carrying his tiny coffin into the crematorium was heartbreaking.

“The funeral directors were great and gave us Nathan’s hand and footprint as a keepsake – it’s the only thing we have.

“I also donated my wedding dress and had it made into clothing for Nathan to be buried in.”

The couple couldn’t afford a headstone. Nathan’s burial plot is currently marked with a simple wooden cross with a plaque.

Jamie and Vicky are now saving for a permanent headstone to remember their little boy.

Vicky said: “I haven’t been able to do anything for my baby boy – he is not recognised in this world as existing.

“I have to do everything I can and the only thing I can give him is a plot where he rests and headstone to symbolise his importance to us.”

The couple’s friends Sarah Bowker and Ben Pashley, of Manchester, wanted to help Vicky and Jamie secure the headstone for Nathan, and have started a fundraising campaign for £1,000 of the £4,000 total costs.

They wrote: “I know it is coming up to Christmas, but if you can share anything to help them achieve this it would make us so happy.

The love in their home is warm and kind. They would be so grateful to you all.”

Jamie, a data cabling engineer, and Vicky, a full-time mum, want to have the headstone in place as soon as possible, but said £4,000 was a lot of money to save.

Share With Friends:
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Business

Change Your Money Game

Published

on

change money game
Share With Friends:

Change your money game today RESERVE YOUR SEAT HERE: http://bit.ly/2m78pGQ

Click the link to register.

“Your career, business and future may depend on what you learn today about the blockchain and cryptocurrency technology. Learn today what can build your tomorrow”

RESERVE YOUR SEAT HERE: http://bit.ly/2m78pGQ

Share With Friends:
Continue Reading

24 Hours Across Africa

Abiy Ahmed wins the 2019 Nobel Peace Award

Published

on

Share With Friends:

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize for immersly efforts to end two decades of hostility with longtime enemy Eritrea.

Though Africa’s youngest leader still faces big challenges, he has in under two years in power begun political and economic reforms that promise a better life for many in impoverished Ethiopia and restored ties with Eritrea that had been frozen since a 1998-2000 border war.

“We are proud as a nation,” the prime minister’s office said in a statement, hailing a “collective win for all Ethiopians, and a call to strengthen our resolve in making Ethiopia – the new horizon of hope – a prosperous nation for all.”

It said the prize was meant to recognize “all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast African regions.”

The Nobel Committee’s decision appeared designed to encourage the peace process, echoing the 1994 peace prize shared by Israeli and Palestinian leaders and the 1993 award for moves towards reconciliation in South Africa, said Dan Smith, head of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

@ Anttention Fresh,                
We work hard to ensure that any news brought to you is legitimate and valuable so we leave out the noise. This material, and other digital content on this website, may be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part BUT give us credit as your source. 

DOWNLOAD ANTTENTION FRESH NEWS ON THE GO APP
JOIN AN ONLINE LEARNING COMMUNITY CLICK IMAGEonline training

Share With Friends:
Continue Reading

Facebook

Advertisement
Flag Counter
Advertisement

Oven-Hot

Copyright © 2018 Anttention Media. All rights reserved