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Ethiopia bans adoption of children by foreigners

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Ethiopian lawmakers have approved a ban on foreign adoptions amid concerns about mistreatment of children overseas.

The approval came after rare heated debate as some lawmakers worried that the East African nation does not have enough child care centers to handle the effects of the ban.

Ethiopia had been among the top 10 countries for adoptions in the United States, according to State Department figures released last year. Actress Angelina Jolie is among the people who have adopted a child from the country.

But the death in the U.S. in 2011 of an Ethiopia-born girl, with her adoptive mother convicted of homicide by abuse, led to an outcry back home, with Ethiopia that year reducing foreign adoptions by 90 percent.

The U.S. in November warned that Ethiopian authorities continued to tighten restrictions on adoptions and that the State Department would continue to engage Ethiopia’s government “to address its concerns.”

Ethiopia’s new National Child Policy says orphans should grow up only in their homeland while honoring their culture and traditions. “They should either be adopted locally or supported by a guardian family, tutor or help them to reunite with biological parents or relatives,” it says.

The state-affiliated Fana Broadcasting Corporate quoted a legal affairs official at the legislative body, Petros Woldesenbet, as saying the ban on foreign adoptions will “help alleviate the identity and psychological problems of children.”

The law will come into effect once it is published in the government legal gazette, which is expected in the coming weeks.

The number of foreign children adopted by U.S. parents dropped almost 5 percent in 2016 to 5,372, continuing a steady decline over more than a decade, according to State Department figures. Department officials have suggested the numbers could rise if the U.S. adoption community helped to address some countries’ concerns about ethics and oversight.

Adoption advocates — and the State Department — have cited Africa as an area where adoptions may increase.

Business

Absa became the new competitor on the Ethiopia market.

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Absa Bank Of South Africa’s  has become the Latest Multinational Corporation to show Interest in Organizing the Ethiopia market.

Ethiopia has since Prevented Foreign Ownership in Economic Sectors that Includes Banking but Abiy Ahmed has began to take fast Action on the issue since he came to power in April.



Jason Quinn, the bank’s chief financial officer, told reporters that Absa was investigating on how and where to enter in a number of populating market, including Nigeria and Angola.

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Am Entrance made into the Ethiopia market of 100 million People, would be part of a Scheme made by Absa after it break from Britain’s Barclays in 2017.

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Ethiopia has plans to liberalise state-owned companies including Ethiopian Airlines, Ethio Telecom, Ethiopian Shipping & Logistics Services Enterprise, and Ethiopian Electric Power, in order to attract foreign direct investment and stimulate growth.

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Motherland News

Black box of the Ethiopian Airline Crash recovered.

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The United Nations described the Sunday crash of the Ethiopia airline as disastrous saying it has cost them a great loss.



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Michael Moller, director-general of the U.N. European head garters said this was the worst loss suffered in years in Geneva in a statement where 150 people where gathered.

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Investigators in Ethiopia have recovered the black box from the ill-fated Ethiopian airline this Sunday.

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