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NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT SODA CAN REDUCE YOUR CHANCE OF CONCEIVING.

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If you are trying to get pregnant, you might want to cut back on soda; a new study has found that it could reduce your chances of conceiving.

New research — which has now been published in the journal Epidemiology — finds that drinking one or more sugary drinks each day is linked to reduced fertility, for both men and women.

In the United States, infertility is experienced by around 15 percent of couples, with the annual cost of fertility treatments in the country equaling more than $5 billion.

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If modifiable risk factors can be identified, then raising awareness of them may help to reduce the psychological stress and financial burden experienced by couples who are struggling to conceive.

However, the past half a century has seen a significant rise in the amount of added sugar in the average diet of a U.S. individual. One third of this total sugar intake comes from soda and other sugar-sweetened drinks, which are associated with weight gain and conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

Drinking soda is also tied to early menstruation and poor semen quality — although few studies have investigated the direct effects that soda may have on fertility.

To further investigate potential associations between drinking soda and infertility, researchers from Boston University School of Public Health in Massachusetts surveyed 3,828 women — all aged between 21 and 45 — and 1,045 of their male partners.

All of the participants lived in the U.S. or Canada and were a part of the Pregnancy Study Online web-based prospective cohort study.

The team collected data on the participants’ medical history, lifestyle factors, and diet. The female subjects also completed follow-up questionnaires every 2 months until they either became pregnant or the 12-month follow-up period came to an end.

Women who drank at least one soda per day demonstrated a 25 percent lower monthly probability of conception, while men who drank at least one soda per day had a 33 percent lower probability of successfully conceiving with their partner.

Drinking energy drinks was tied to even greater reductions in fertility, but the study authors suggest that this result should be interpreted with caution, as the association was based on results from only a small number of participants.

The researchers did not find a strong association between infertility and drinking fruit juices or diet sodas.

The authors explain that given the amount of sugary drinks consumed across the U.S., their findings may have important implications for public health.

“We found positive associations,” says lead study author Elizabeth Hatch, who is a professor of epidemiology, “between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and lower fertility, which were consistent after controlling for many other factors, including obesity, caffeine intake, alcohol, smoking, and overall diet quality.”

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Health & Lifestyle

DR Congo blame Unending Ebola Outbreak on Violence , Community Mistrust.

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DR Congo Ministry of Health spokesperson Jessica Ilunga has declared that violence and community mistrust have continued to hamper all efforts to control and end the fresh Ebola outbreak, which started Aug. 1.



Though according to the World Health Organization the number of new Ebola cases has dropped slightly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as there are 33% fewer cases to date in February compared with the same time period in December per STAT’s Helen Branswell, but some experts warn Axios that there remain signs that this outbreak is far from over.

Meanwhile, some experts warn that, that doesn’t mean the world’s second-largest Ebola outbreak on record is yet under control, and in fact it could simply be moving to new areas of the sprawling country.

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Johns Hopkins’ public health expert Jennifer Nuzzo maintains there are several reasons people should continue to view this outbreak as a cause for concern.

However, Nuzzo said Congo needs more than money from the international community and the U.S. in particular. Safety concerns have largely caused the CDC to limit its Ebola experts to the capital city of Kinshasa, where some have returned after being evacuated during an uptick in election-related violence, Nuzzo added that Now is the time for the U.S. to send them into the field.

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Health & Lifestyle

Sports head injuries Balanced reportage is required – Experts

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A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists, including Mark Herceg, PhD, a neuropsychologist at Northwell Health’s Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and a member of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, published a correspondence today in The Lancet Neurology, asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a type of dementia associated with exposure to repeated concussions, and has been linked with a variety of contact sports such as boxing, football, American football and rugby.



Although CTE is commonly featured in the news media and discussed among peers, the medical community is just beginning to understand how to recognize the disease, guidelines for how to assess its severity have yet to be established.

“We don’t currently have a clear understanding of the link between CTE pathology and any specific symptoms,” noted Dr. Herceg. “It’s important to note to the public at large that CTE is at an early stage of scientific and medical understanding, with many important aspects of the disease yet to be established.”

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“Dr. Herceg and his colleague’s CTE research is timely and impactful as a major step forward to more clearly defining the risk and prevalence of this important syndrome,” said Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute.

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-Northwell Health

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