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Causes Of Nausea Before Period.

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Some people experience nausea just before they get their period. This is common and is not usually a cause for concern.

Nausea before a period could be caused by many factors, including cramps, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and pregnancy. If symptoms are severe, this could indicate an underlying condition such as endometriosis.

PMS is the main cause of nausea before a period. Around 20 to 50 percent of women experience PMS in the 7 to 10 days before their period.

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Read on to learn about possible causes and treatments for nausea before a period.

Nausea before a period is common. What matters most, however, is what is normal for the individual.

Feeling nauseated before a period may be a regular symptom for some people. However, a sudden change in PMS symptoms can indicate an underlying medical problem.

A person should also see a doctor if they are:

  • experiencing this symptom for the first time

  • unable to keep down any food

  • losing weight due to frequent vomiting

  • feeling dehydrated

  • experiencing vomiting that gets worse over several days

    Nausea before a period is often caused by PMS. However, there are some other possible causes, so it is wise to speak to a doctor if the symptoms are unusual or interfering with everyday activities.

    Causes for nausea before a period include:

    PMS is a very common cause of nausea before a period. A person often experiences additional symptoms of PMS, including a headache, dizziness, fatigue, diarrhea, and muscle aches.

    Researchers are still unsure about what causes PMS, and why some people experience it and others do not.

    Possible explanations for PMS include:

    • Serotonin levels. Serotonin is a brain chemical linked to mood. There is some evidence that serotonin levels are lower before periods begin. Low serotonin can cause depression, anxiety, and other symptoms.

    • Nutritional deficiencies. Not eating enough calcium or magnesium may make PMS worse.

    • Endocrine disorders. The endocrine system regulates hormone levels. Problems with it due to diabetes, thyroid disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), or other diseases may make PMS worse.

    • Hormonal shifts. Estrogen and progesterone are highest after ovulation because these hormones play key roles in pregnancy. When a period begins, estrogen and progesterone levels fall. Women with PMS typically experience nausea either right before a period or right after it starts.

    • Genetics. While doctors have not identified specific genes linked to PMS, it seems to run in families.

    Hormones are the body’s chemical messengers, so changes in hormone levels can affect how it responds to many experiences.

    A 2018 study of women undergoing breast cancer surgery under general anesthesia, found a link between menstruation and vomiting. Women were much more likely to experience vomiting after surgery when they were getting their periods.

    Many women experience bloating before and at the start of their period. Can lifestyle changes offer some relief?

    Period bloating: Seven tips for relief

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of PMS. People with PMDD typically also have serious mood swings and may have depression and anxiety.

    Endometriosis

    Endometriosis is when tissue similar to the tissue that lines the uterus develops outside of it, sticking to other organs, such as the ovaries and fallopian tubes.

    Some women with endometriosis do not have symptoms. For others, endometriosis can be debilitating, causing intense pain and heavy bleeding during a period and even throughout the month. Endometriosis is also a leading cause of infertility.

    One study found higher rates of stomach and digestive problems in women with endometriosis. Around 85 percent of women with endometriosis reported gastrointestinal problems during the previous year.

    In addition to nausea, they also reported gas, bloating, diarrhea, stomach pain, and constipation.

    Pregnancy

    Nausea and vomiting are among the earliest signs of pregnancy. These symptoms may appear even before a woman misses her period.

    Shortly after a fertilized egg implants itself in the uterus, a woman’s body begins producing human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (HCG).

    HCG may play a role in morning sickness. It is also how most home pregnancy tests detect pregnancy.

    Illness or infection

    Not all symptoms that happen during a period are due to menstruation. Food poisoning, stomach viruses, food sensitivities, and a range of other health issues may cause nausea around the time of a period.

    People experiencing nausea before their period for the first time, especially if it is severe or accompanied by vomiting or intense stomach pain, may have an unrelated illness or infection.

    Anyone experiencing frequent nausea before their period should talk to a doctor about possible underlying causes. The treatment they recommend will depend on what is responsible for nausea.

    Some strategies that may help reduce mild nausea include:

    • taking anti-nausea medication, such as Gravol or Pepto-Bismol

    • monitoring food intake with a food diary to check for anything that might trigger nausea near a period

    If nausea before a period is caused by an underlying medical condition, a doctor may recommend:

    • birth control pills, which can help regulate hormones and are sometimes prescribed for endometriosis, PMDD, and PMS

    • surgery to remove endometrial tissue that is outside of the uterus

    • antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which can help regulate serotonin levels and reduce symptoms of PMDD and PMS.

      Nausea is a common premenstrual symptom. For most people with nausea before a period, the symptoms can be managed with over-the-counter medications and by avoiding any trigger foods.

      However, if nausea does not improve with conservative methods or if it is interfering with daily life, a person should speak to a doctor who specializes in menstrual health and work with them to come up with a treatment plan.

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DR Congo blame Unending Ebola Outbreak on Violence , Community Mistrust.

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DR Congo Ministry of Health spokesperson Jessica Ilunga has declared that violence and community mistrust have continued to hamper all efforts to control and end the fresh Ebola outbreak, which started Aug. 1.



Though according to the World Health Organization the number of new Ebola cases has dropped slightly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as there are 33% fewer cases to date in February compared with the same time period in December per STAT’s Helen Branswell, but some experts warn Axios that there remain signs that this outbreak is far from over.

Meanwhile, some experts warn that, that doesn’t mean the world’s second-largest Ebola outbreak on record is yet under control, and in fact it could simply be moving to new areas of the sprawling country.

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Johns Hopkins’ public health expert Jennifer Nuzzo maintains there are several reasons people should continue to view this outbreak as a cause for concern.

However, Nuzzo said Congo needs more than money from the international community and the U.S. in particular. Safety concerns have largely caused the CDC to limit its Ebola experts to the capital city of Kinshasa, where some have returned after being evacuated during an uptick in election-related violence, Nuzzo added that Now is the time for the U.S. to send them into the field.

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Sports head injuries Balanced reportage is required – Experts

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A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists, including Mark Herceg, PhD, a neuropsychologist at Northwell Health’s Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and a member of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, published a correspondence today in The Lancet Neurology, asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a type of dementia associated with exposure to repeated concussions, and has been linked with a variety of contact sports such as boxing, football, American football and rugby.



Although CTE is commonly featured in the news media and discussed among peers, the medical community is just beginning to understand how to recognize the disease, guidelines for how to assess its severity have yet to be established.

“We don’t currently have a clear understanding of the link between CTE pathology and any specific symptoms,” noted Dr. Herceg. “It’s important to note to the public at large that CTE is at an early stage of scientific and medical understanding, with many important aspects of the disease yet to be established.”

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“Dr. Herceg and his colleague’s CTE research is timely and impactful as a major step forward to more clearly defining the risk and prevalence of this important syndrome,” said Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute.

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-Northwell Health

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