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How true is the variation in female sex organ?

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A woman’s vagina is a sex organ as well as part of the birth canal. Just as women can have different sized breasts, hands, and feet, the size and depth of vaginas can also vary.

According to one study, the average depth of a vagina is about 3.77 inches, which is 9.6 centimeters (cm). Other sources suggest that the average range of size may be about 3 to 7 inches(approximately 7.6–17.7 cm)

However, these variations in size are not usually apparent, even to a sexual partner.

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Size and appearance of the vagina

A report in the British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology said that the average depth of the vagina is about 3.77 inches (9.6 cm), but that vaginal depth and appearance can vary widely.

In fact, the depth of the vagina (from the opening to the tip of the cervix) can measure anywhere up to 7 inches (17.7 cm).

The vagina is the canal to the cervix, which separates the uterus and the vagina.

Several types of tissue line the inside of the vagina, including the mucosa. The mucosa is made up of specialized cells that secrete a lubricating fluid, which helps the vaginal walls to stretch.

The exterior portion of the female genitals is the vulva. The vulva includes the labia minora and majora — the lip-like parts of the female genitals.

The appearance of vulvas varies widely. The skin may be the same color or darker than the rest of the body. The labia majora, which are the external “lips,” can vary from around 2.7 to 4.7 inches (7 to 12 cm) in length.

The clitoris ranges from about 0.1 to 1.3 inches (5 to 35 mm) in size but swells and enlarges if a woman is aroused.

What affects vaginal size?

The vagina’s size and depth changes in certain situations. It can stretch to accommodate the insertion of a tampon, a finger, or a penis.

During arousal, more blood flows to the vagina. This causes the vagina to elongate and the cervix, or tip of the uterus, to lift up slightly, allowing more of a penis, finger, or sex toy to fit in the vagina.

While a vagina expands during arousal, a large penis or sex toy can still cause discomfort when having sex.

How does the vagina change over time?

The vagina will not change in appearance, as it is internal. In fact, research has found no link between the depth of a person’s vagina and their age.

However, the labia may appear smaller over time. This is because the amount of estrogen in the body decreases with age, which can reduce fat and collagen.

The genitals may also appear to change color, becoming lighter or darker with hormonal changes over time.

Some women may find that their vagina feels different following childbirth. While the tissues in the vagina do stretch to accommodate a baby, this is not permanent.

Research has found no difference in vaginal length between women who had given birth and those who had not.

If a person thinks their vagina feels different after childbirth, a doctor may recommend Kegel exercises, which involve squeezing and releasing the muscles used to control urination to help strengthen the pelvic floor.

Vagina size and penis length

The average erect penis is about 33 percent longer than the average vagina. While both penis and vagina sizes can vary, these organs can usually accommodate each other.

A 2015 study found the average erect penis length to be just over 5 inches (13.12 cm). Some women may report discomfort if their sexual partner has a penis that is larger than average.

It may be painful or uncomfortable if an object such as a penis or sex toy hits the cervix. Having adequate lubrication and communicating any discomfort to a partner can help keep sexual activity pleasurable.

Self-care tips

Tips for keeping the vagina healthy include:

  • avoiding douching or using highly fragranced bath products, tampons, or feminine hygiene sprays

  • changing out of wet clothing and swimsuits as quickly as possible to reduce the risk of infection

  • changing pads and tampons frequently

  • using protection during sexual activity

  • refraining from wearing clothing that is too tight, which can contribute to irritation and excess sweat

  • urinating after sex to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs).

    The depth and appearance of vaginas vary greatly between individuals. Usually, the depth of the vagina is between 3 and 7 inches.

    The vagina is an organ that is designed to accommodate both childbirth and sexual activity. However, if a woman is experiencing pain during sex due to what she perceives as a shallow vagina, she should talk to her doctor.

    Doctors can investigate any underlying causes for the pain, and may refer someone to a specialist. A specialist may recommend pelvic floor therapy or sex therapy, which can make sex more pleasurable regardless of vaginal depth.

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Health & Lifestyle

Impact of Chronic Noise on Heart Health

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Exposure to a high level of noise on a regular basis can wreak havoc on the cardiovascular system, according to new research.



The leader of the study was Dr. Azar Radfar, Ph.D., a research fellow at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The findings will be presented at Scientific Sessions 2018, held by the American Heart Association (AHA) in Chicago, IL.

Dr. Radfar’s team found that noise exposure causes an elevated stress response in the human brain.

This can lead to inflammation in the blood vessels, which can cause serious health problems, including a heart attack or stroke.

The research included 499 participants, who were free from cardiovascular disease and cancer at the study’s start.

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Noise and cardiovascular events

The participants underwent positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scans of their brains and blood vessels. The researchers also looked at the activity of the amygdala, a region of the brain that regulates stress and emotional response.

The team estimated participants’ regular exposure to noise by comparing their home addresses with data from the United States Department of Transportation’s National Transportation Noise Map, which includes information about levels of roadway and aviation noise.

 



Years later, the researchers examined the participants’ medical records for evidence of cardiovascular events. Of the 499 original participants, 40 had experienced a heart attack or stroke in the 5 years that followed the initial testing.

After analyzing the data, the team discovered that participants with the highest levels of noise exposure also had the most noticeable stress-related brain activity. In addition, they had more inflammation in their arteries.

Increased blood vessel inflammation is a well-established risk factor for heart disease, so finding a link between this inflammation and cardiovascular events was no surprise.

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However, participants with the most stress-related brain activity were more than three times as likely to experience a major cardiovascular event, such as a heart attack or stroke.

Even after accounting for other risk factors, such as air pollution, smoking, and diabetes, the team concluded that participants exposed to higher levels of noise pollution had an increased risk of cardiovascular events.

What are the next steps?

Determining whether decreasing noise exposure can reduce the risk of heart disease will require further research. The study’s authors urge doctors to consider high noise levels as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events.

While simply moving away from an area with noise pollution is usually not an option, the authors urge their readers to consider ways to decrease high levels of ambient noise.

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Health & Lifestyle

Experiment shows social media use increases depression and anxiety

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After the three weeks were up, the students were surveyed again using the same tools to measure their well-being. These tools measured outcomes like depression, loneliness, anxiety, and that most millennial of worries, fear of missing out. The group of students who limited their social media usage showed significant decreases in anxiety and fear of missing out from the start of the experiment. In particular, people who had higher levels of depression at the start of the study showed a decrease in depressive symptoms when they limited their social media time. One subject described the experience personally: “Not comparing my life to the lives of others had a much stronger impact than I expected, and I felt a lot more positive about myself during those weeks.”

While plenty have studies have looked at well-being and internet use and found that, for example, anxious people tend to have a problematic approach to internet use or that depression can be identified through social media use, this is the first study to confirm this link experimentally. It shows that it is not merely the case that depressed, anxious, or unhappy people happen to use social media more often, but rather that the act of using the sites decreases well-being. The researchers recommend limiting social media use to 30 minutes per day to improve your mood and mental health.

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