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How true is the variation in female sex organ?

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A woman’s vagina is a sex organ as well as part of the birth canal. Just as women can have different sized breasts, hands, and feet, the size and depth of vaginas can also vary.

According to one study, the average depth of a vagina is about 3.77 inches, which is 9.6 centimeters (cm). Other sources suggest that the average range of size may be about 3 to 7 inches(approximately 7.6–17.7 cm)

However, these variations in size are not usually apparent, even to a sexual partner.

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Size and appearance of the vagina

A report in the British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology said that the average depth of the vagina is about 3.77 inches (9.6 cm), but that vaginal depth and appearance can vary widely.

In fact, the depth of the vagina (from the opening to the tip of the cervix) can measure anywhere up to 7 inches (17.7 cm).

The vagina is the canal to the cervix, which separates the uterus and the vagina.

Several types of tissue line the inside of the vagina, including the mucosa. The mucosa is made up of specialized cells that secrete a lubricating fluid, which helps the vaginal walls to stretch.

The exterior portion of the female genitals is the vulva. The vulva includes the labia minora and majora — the lip-like parts of the female genitals.

The appearance of vulvas varies widely. The skin may be the same color or darker than the rest of the body. The labia majora, which are the external “lips,” can vary from around 2.7 to 4.7 inches (7 to 12 cm) in length.

The clitoris ranges from about 0.1 to 1.3 inches (5 to 35 mm) in size but swells and enlarges if a woman is aroused.

What affects vaginal size?

The vagina’s size and depth changes in certain situations. It can stretch to accommodate the insertion of a tampon, a finger, or a penis.

During arousal, more blood flows to the vagina. This causes the vagina to elongate and the cervix, or tip of the uterus, to lift up slightly, allowing more of a penis, finger, or sex toy to fit in the vagina.

While a vagina expands during arousal, a large penis or sex toy can still cause discomfort when having sex.

How does the vagina change over time?

The vagina will not change in appearance, as it is internal. In fact, research has found no link between the depth of a person’s vagina and their age.

However, the labia may appear smaller over time. This is because the amount of estrogen in the body decreases with age, which can reduce fat and collagen.

The genitals may also appear to change color, becoming lighter or darker with hormonal changes over time.

Some women may find that their vagina feels different following childbirth. While the tissues in the vagina do stretch to accommodate a baby, this is not permanent.

Research has found no difference in vaginal length between women who had given birth and those who had not.

If a person thinks their vagina feels different after childbirth, a doctor may recommend Kegel exercises, which involve squeezing and releasing the muscles used to control urination to help strengthen the pelvic floor.

Vagina size and penis length

The average erect penis is about 33 percent longer than the average vagina. While both penis and vagina sizes can vary, these organs can usually accommodate each other.

A 2015 study found the average erect penis length to be just over 5 inches (13.12 cm). Some women may report discomfort if their sexual partner has a penis that is larger than average.

It may be painful or uncomfortable if an object such as a penis or sex toy hits the cervix. Having adequate lubrication and communicating any discomfort to a partner can help keep sexual activity pleasurable.

Self-care tips

Tips for keeping the vagina healthy include:

  • avoiding douching or using highly fragranced bath products, tampons, or feminine hygiene sprays

  • changing out of wet clothing and swimsuits as quickly as possible to reduce the risk of infection

  • changing pads and tampons frequently

  • using protection during sexual activity

  • refraining from wearing clothing that is too tight, which can contribute to irritation and excess sweat

  • urinating after sex to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs).

    The depth and appearance of vaginas vary greatly between individuals. Usually, the depth of the vagina is between 3 and 7 inches.

    The vagina is an organ that is designed to accommodate both childbirth and sexual activity. However, if a woman is experiencing pain during sex due to what she perceives as a shallow vagina, she should talk to her doctor.

    Doctors can investigate any underlying causes for the pain, and may refer someone to a specialist. A specialist may recommend pelvic floor therapy or sex therapy, which can make sex more pleasurable regardless of vaginal depth.

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Health & Lifestyle

DR Congo blame Unending Ebola Outbreak on Violence , Community Mistrust.

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DR Congo Ministry of Health spokesperson Jessica Ilunga has declared that violence and community mistrust have continued to hamper all efforts to control and end the fresh Ebola outbreak, which started Aug. 1.



Though according to the World Health Organization the number of new Ebola cases has dropped slightly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as there are 33% fewer cases to date in February compared with the same time period in December per STAT’s Helen Branswell, but some experts warn Axios that there remain signs that this outbreak is far from over.

Meanwhile, some experts warn that, that doesn’t mean the world’s second-largest Ebola outbreak on record is yet under control, and in fact it could simply be moving to new areas of the sprawling country.

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Johns Hopkins’ public health expert Jennifer Nuzzo maintains there are several reasons people should continue to view this outbreak as a cause for concern.

However, Nuzzo said Congo needs more than money from the international community and the U.S. in particular. Safety concerns have largely caused the CDC to limit its Ebola experts to the capital city of Kinshasa, where some have returned after being evacuated during an uptick in election-related violence, Nuzzo added that Now is the time for the U.S. to send them into the field.

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Health & Lifestyle

Sports head injuries Balanced reportage is required – Experts

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A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists, including Mark Herceg, PhD, a neuropsychologist at Northwell Health’s Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and a member of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, published a correspondence today in The Lancet Neurology, asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a type of dementia associated with exposure to repeated concussions, and has been linked with a variety of contact sports such as boxing, football, American football and rugby.



Although CTE is commonly featured in the news media and discussed among peers, the medical community is just beginning to understand how to recognize the disease, guidelines for how to assess its severity have yet to be established.

“We don’t currently have a clear understanding of the link between CTE pathology and any specific symptoms,” noted Dr. Herceg. “It’s important to note to the public at large that CTE is at an early stage of scientific and medical understanding, with many important aspects of the disease yet to be established.”

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“Dr. Herceg and his colleague’s CTE research is timely and impactful as a major step forward to more clearly defining the risk and prevalence of this important syndrome,” said Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute.

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-Northwell Health

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