Connect with us

Motherland News

War-scarred Sierra Leone picks president

Published

on

Sierra Leone voters queued for hours in steamy humidity on Wednesday to elect a new leader they hope will end years of economic crisis caused by twin shocks of a commodities slump and an Ebola epidemic.

President Ernest Bai Koroma is stepping aside, having completed his maximum two terms in office, and sixteen candidates are vying to replace him, of whom four are seen as having a realistic chance.

Adama Sesay, a widow with six children, was so anxious to get to the polling station that she left her house at five.

“I am a single parent and things are not easy for me economically so I’m waiting in line to cast my vote for the future,” she told Reuters at a polling station in Waterloo, a village nestled in palm trees and forest on the outskirts of the West African country’s capital.

“In Sierra Leone we are far behind some other countries in Africa, which are making progress,” Sesay said.

The Ebola crisis starting in 2014 and the global commodities downturn dragged Sierra Leone’s economy into the doldrums. It shrank by a fifth in 2015, after years of double-digit growth during its rebound from a ruinous 1990s civil war in which child soldiers fought and tens of thousands died.

Since then, growth has been sluggish and many hope Koroma’s 10-year stint will be followed by a leader who can do more to improve the lives of citizens on the poverty line. Despite those frustrations, and the long waits, voting went ahead peacefully.

“I see out there people responding to calls we have made, people behaving in a manner that is democratic and I see our people are transforming the country,” Koroma said, casting his vote in Freetown’s Goderich district.

“Sierra Leone has matured, which gives me a sense of satisfaction … that (it) is on the path of development.”

Politics has been dominated by two ruling parties since independence from Britain in 1961: the ruling All People’s Congress, now fielding ex-foreign minister Samura Kamara, and the Sierra Leone People’s Party behind Julius Maada Bio, who briefly ruled as head of a military junta in 1996.

But two candidates from younger parties – former United Nations Under-Secretary Kandeh Yumkella and Samuel Sam-Sumana – are seen as having a strong chance if they can garner enough votes from disaffected younger people tired of the status quo.

Crime

Nigeria Football Federation boss Amaju Pinnick under fresh corruption probe

Published

on

Several properties belonging to top officials of the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF), including its president Amaju Pinnick, have been seized in a fresh corruption probe.

The latest investigation and seizures are being carried out by the country’s Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Commission’s (ICPC).

The ICPC has published a newspaper advertisement about the properties seized – half of which belong to Pinnick.

According to the statement published in the Nigerian papers one of Pinnick’s properties is in London.

It comes amidst wide-ranging claims over how money meant for football development allegedly disappeared.

“We can’t go into further details beyond the fact that many officials of the NFF are under investigation,” ICPC spokesperson, Rasheedat Okoduwa said.

“It’s basically because what they have is in excess of what they have earned.”

The ICPC has also taken control of properties belonging to the NFF second vice-president Shehu Dikko and the general secretary Muhamed Sanusi among others.

Source: BBC

Continue Reading

24 Hours Across Africa

Rwanda ban Burundi,s music star ahead of annual festival

Published

on

Burundian musician Jean Pierre Nimbona, popularly known as Kidum, has told the BBC he is confused by Rwanda’s decision to ban him from playing at the upcoming Kigali Jazz Fusion festival.

Kidum is one of Burundi’s biggest music stars and has performed in Rwanda for the past 16 years.

But a police official phoned the musician’s manager to warn that he would only be allowed to make private visits to Rwanda.

“[My manager was told] Kidum is not supposed to perform, tell him to leave. If he comes for private visits fine, but no performances,” the musician told BBC’s Focus on Africa radio programme.

The mayor of Rwanda’s capital said that in this instance permission had not been sought from the authorities for him to perform at the festival in Kigali.

Kidum was a leading peace activist during Burundi’s civil war between 1993 and 2003 and used his songs to call for reconciliation.

The 44-year-old musician said he had never had problems with Rwandan authorities until recently when three of his shows were cancelled at the last minute – including one in December 2018.

That month Burundi had banned Meddy, a musician who is half-Burundian, half-Rwandan, from performing in the main city of Bujumbura.

Kidum said he was unsure if the diplomatic tensions between Burundi and Rwanda had influenced his ban.

“I don’t know, I don’t have any evidence about that. And if there was politics, I’m not a player in politics, I’m just a freelance musician based in Nairobi,” he said.

He said he would not challenge the ban: “There’s nothing I can do, I just wait until maybe the decision is changed some day.

“It’s similar to a family house and you are denied entry… so you just have to wait maybe until the head of the family decides otherwise.”

Continue Reading

Facebook

Advertisement
Flag Counter
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2018 Anttention Media. All rights reserved