page contents
Connect with us

Health & Lifestyle

Mozambique to circumcise 100,000 men

Published

on

3e9ac2cd-bb4c-4c15-ae1e-2610d76ebe02

More than 100,000 men in Mozambique are to be circumcised in a bid to help prevent sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/Aids.

The health authorities in the central province of Zambezia say their campaign will focus on districts of Ato-Molocue, Ile and Gurue, where circumcision is not a common practice.

This is the second phase of a project that kicked off last year with the circumcision of 84,000 men in the province.

FOLLOW US ON:
 INSTAGRAMLINKEDINYOUTUBETWITTER & FACEBOOK

Abdul Razak, a medical doctor by profession and governor of Zambezia – one of Mozambique’s most populated provinces – is backing the campaign:

What I want to underline is that male circumcision and other measures are used to prevent diseases, such as HIV/Aids. They don’t cure the patient.”

It is voluntary, but men are being encouraged to undergo the surgery because of the difference it makes in preventing HIV infection.

The cost of the two rounds of circumcisions in Zambezia province will come to more than $1m (£728,000), funds provided by the US initiative President’s Emergency Plan for Aids Relief (Pepfar).

Male circumcision is common in many other places in Mozambique, including the provinces of Cabo Delgado, Niassa, Tete and Inhambane.

According to the World Health Organization, male circumcision reduces the risk of heterosexual men getting HIV by approximately 60%

TO DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE TV APP CLICK HERE
WATCH FREE MOBILE TV CHANNELS HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Health & Lifestyle

Climate change forces El Paso to make treated sewage water turn into drinking water

Published

on

As the global climate changes and water becomes an increasingly scarce resource, a number of cities such as India, Australia has earlier express their concern to reduce water shortage.



The authorities has disclosed to her citizens stating that “What we are seeing is a systematic increase in temperature, so we’re seeing the snow-melt runoff earlier…and more rapid melt than average. And again, for a given level of snow-pack, less runoff actually reaching the river and reaching our reservoir.

IMG-20180912-WA0030

However, in a bid to mitigate the water shortages,  El Paso is set to become one of the first cities in the US to treat sewage water and turn it into drinking water.

Chief technical officer of El Paso Water, Mr Gilbert Trejo said that the facility to treat sewage water with multiple steps of filtration such as carbon and UV filtration to make sure no pathogens or microbes are present.

FOLLOW US ON:
 INSTAGRAMLINKEDINYOUTUBETWITTER & FACEBOOK

Adding that It will help to solve a major supply problem in the city and what’s more, some locals even say it tastes better.

TO DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE NEWS APP CLICK HERE
WATCH RUSSIA 2018 HIGHLIGHTS HERE

Continue Reading

Food & Cuisine

Satellites warn African farmers of pest parasitic diseases

Published

on

Prof Charlotte Watts, chief scientific adviser for the UK’s Department for International Development, which funds the plant doctor scheme, says a new initiative with CABI and the UK Space Agency (UKSA) will use the network to prevent, rather than just reduce infestations.



When speaking to the newsmen, she expressed that the idea is to use satellite data collected by the UKSA to develop a system that is able to predict when pest infestations will strike a week or more in advance.

IMG-20180912-WA0030

It is also designed to inform the farmers through mobile phone alert for them to take precautions, adding that it will help boost farmers incomes and mitigate poverty rate.

FOLLOW US ON:
 INSTAGRAMLINKEDINYOUTUBETWITTER & FACEBOOK

The modern forecast is being used in Kenya, Ghana and Zambia and will be rolled out soon to other part of the world.

TO DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE NEWS APP CLICK HERE
WATCH RUSSIA 2018 HIGHLIGHTS HERE

 

Continue Reading

Facebook

Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2018 Anttention Media. All rights reserved