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6 Surprising Diseases Your Hands Might Predict

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From finger length to grip strength, our hands can indicate risk factors for a number of surprising conditions.

Finger length reveals: Arthritis risk

Women with ring fingers that are longer than their index fingers, typically a male trait, are twice as likely to have osteoarthritis in the knees, according to an Arthritis & Rheumatism study. Low estrogen levels may be a factor.

Shaky hands reveal: Parkinson’s disease

Trembling hands could be the result of something as simple as too much caffeine or a side effect of certain medications like asthma drugs and antidepressants. But it’s a good idea to see your doctor if the issue recurs. A tremor in just one hand can be a first symptom of Parkinson’s disease, or it can indicate essential tremor, a disorder that causes uncontrollable shaking and is treatable with therapy or medication.

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Nail color reveals: Kidney disease

When Indian researchers studied 100 patients with chronic kidney disease, they found that 36 percent had half-and-half nails, when the bottom of a nail is white and the top is brown. The nail condition may be caused by an increased concentration of certain hormones and chronic anemia, both traits of chronic kidney disease. See your doctor right away if you notice half-and-half nails or a dark, vertical stripe beneath the nail bed. This can be hidden melanoma, a skin cancer.

Grip strength reveals: Heart health

A weak grip predicts a higher risk of heart attack or stroke and lower chances of survival, according to a new Lancet study of nearly 140,000 adults in 17 countries. Grip strength was a better predictor of death than was blood pressure. Researchers say grip strength is a marker of overall muscle strength and fitness, and they recommend whole-body strength training and aerobic exercise to reduce heart disease risk.

Sweaty palms reveal: Hyperhidrosis

Overly clammy hands may be a symptom of menopause or thyroid conditions, as well as hyperhidrosis, in which overactive sweat glands cause far more perspiration than necessary. Most people with the condition sweat from only one or two parts of the body, such as the armpits, palms, or feet. A doctor may prescribe a strong antiperspirant to decrease sweat production.

Fingerprints reveal: High blood pressure

When British researchers studied 139 fingerprints, they found that people with a whorl (spiral) pattern on one or more fingers were more likely to have high blood pressure than people with arches or loops. The more fingers with whorls a participant had, the higher his or her blood pressure was. Fingertip whorls are markers of fetal development problems during certain stages of pregnancy, which may affect blood pressure later in life.

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Health & Lifestyle

Somalia empowers President to appoint foreigner as Central bank governor.

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Somali lawmakers voted on Monday to allow the president to appoint a foreigner as governor of the central bank of the volatile Horn of Africa nation.



Previously only a citizen could be appointed to the role as is the case across much of the continent. The vote was held in the lower house of the parliament.

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An overwhelming majority of lawmakers (158) voted for the change as proposed by the government of President Mohamed Abdullahi Farmaajo and Prime Minister Ali Hassan Khayre.

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Seventeen MPs kicked against the move even though the government justified the proposal by saying the country needed every available expertise to change its fortunes.

Even though there is no known foreign candidate for the role, a presidential assent – which is seen as procedural – will see government headhunt for a a new bank chief.

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Climate change forces El Paso to make treated sewage water turn into drinking water

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As the global climate changes and water becomes an increasingly scarce resource, a number of cities such as India, Australia has earlier express their concern to reduce water shortage.



The authorities has disclosed to her citizens stating that “What we are seeing is a systematic increase in temperature, so we’re seeing the snow-melt runoff earlier…and more rapid melt than average. And again, for a given level of snow-pack, less runoff actually reaching the river and reaching our reservoir.

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However, in a bid to mitigate the water shortages,  El Paso is set to become one of the first cities in the US to treat sewage water and turn it into drinking water.

Chief technical officer of El Paso Water, Mr Gilbert Trejo said that the facility to treat sewage water with multiple steps of filtration such as carbon and UV filtration to make sure no pathogens or microbes are present.

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Adding that It will help to solve a major supply problem in the city and what’s more, some locals even say it tastes better.

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