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7 Facts about dreams that will blow your mind

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Have you ever woken from a ludicrously whacky dream a thought to yourself, “How the HECK did my brain come up with that?”
Like, you were walking around inside a giant plastic nose with your colleagues, all wearing tuxedos and looking at the nasal walls like it was artwork. Or maybe you have the same recurring dream where you’re sprinting through a jungle that’s got a zillion snakes hanging from the branches and slithering all over the ground, and you just have to keep running.

Dreams are weird, and even though there’s a lot of research based on this phenomenon of sleep, there is still much that we can’t explain. But here are some things we do know, and some of it sounds pretty freaky, to be honest. Have a look, and learn something new about how and why we dream up some of that crazy weird stuff we do.

1. You can’t walk in your dreams

According to Men’s Health sleep advisor W Chris Winter, MD, your brain has difficulty recreating the physical feeling of your feet hitting the ground when you’re sleeping. He says that if you were to look down while dreaming, you’ll probably see yourself flying or just floating (you creep you).

2. The “strangers” in your dreams aren’t strangers at all

Many scientists believe that the random people in your dreams are probably people you’ve encountered before. Even if you feel like you’ve never seen them in your life, the theory is that you’ve probably walked past them on the street or seen them on some kind of commercial or something. It looks like our subconscious stores their images for whatever reason.
sleep bed dream man Credit: Pexels

3. You probably dream up mutant people

Just like walking, your brain also struggles to recreate hands and faces as they should be when you’re unconscious, says Winter. The people in your dreams are probably missing fingers or have deformed hands and faces. Really – if you look closely at someone in your dreams, Winter says they’ll probably look blurred or have their noses/eyes/mouths in slightly different spots or even completely absent (*shudders*).

4. Your dreams get wilder later in the night

Research has shown that when you first doze off, your dreams are pretty logical and are basically just you going through everything that happened in your day and making sense of it. But later on, and especially right when you wake up, that’s when your dreams get really weird because your mind is now free to think about anything and everything unbridled.

5. You can control your dreams

Yes, this means you can fight off nightmares too. All you have to do is think of whatever recurring nightmare you have when you’re awake, but imagine it with a happy ending. Alternatively, you can try your hand at the thing called lucid dreaming, which is when you train your brain to stay conscious during dreams. Sounds weird, but it really can work.

6. Not everyone dreams in black and white

A British study found that it’s mainly just older people who dream in black and white, contrary to popular belief that everyone does. They believed that it’s because older generations watched black-and-white TV for a portion of their lives, which is why they struggle to dream in colour sometimes.

7. It’s possible to have dreams within dreams

Inception-like dreams are actually quite common, and often people have a “false-awakening” when they think it’s time to start the day, but only realise they’re still dreaming after stepping into the bathroom and purple goop starts coming out of the taps.

Think you’ll have trouble sleeping tonight after learning all that? Never fear, at least you know that you can control what your unconscious dreams up – if you really put your mind to it.

Health & Lifestyle

Dozens get vaccine after Ebola outbreak in Uganda

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Report says, Ugandan health officials have reacted with the vaccination campaign for people who may have been exposed to Ebola.

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The outbreak, one of the worst in history, started in the Democratic Republic of the Congo last year and spread to Uganda earlier this month.


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24 Hours Across Africa

India doctors embark on strike aimed better security

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Source: Reuters

Thousands of doctors across India went on strike on Friday to demand better security at hospitals days after junior doctors in the city of Kolkata were attacked, leaving services in many government-run health facilities paralyzed.

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The state of West Bengal, of which Kolkata is capital, has been the worst hit by the strike with at least 13 big government hospitals affected.

The protests were sparked by an attack at the NRS Medical College in Kolkata on June 10 that left three junior doctors seriously injured after a dispute with a family whose relative had died.

Doctors demanding better security began a strike but their action was confined to the state until West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee condemned them on Thursday, saying police did not strike when one of their colleagues was killed.

Banerjee’s remarks, which included a warning that junior doctors would be evicted from their college hostels if they did not go back to work, triggered a nationwide reaction.

The Indian Medical Association said the “barbaric” attack at the NRS reflected a national problem, and called for a countrywide protest. It also demanded legislation to safeguard doctors.

Nearly 30,000 doctors were on a one-day strike on Friday, most in West Bengal, New Delhi and the western state of Maharashtra, according to figures proved by medical associations.

The federal health minister, Harsh Vardhan, tried to calm the furor, promising better security at hospitals and calling on Banerjee to withdraw her ultimatum.

“I urge doctors to end their strike in the larger interest of society. I will take all possible measures to ensure a safe environment for them at hospitals across the country,” Vardhan said on Twitter.

India spent an estimated 1.4% of its gross domestic product on healthcare in 2017/18, among the lowest proportions in the world. Many millions of Indians depend on the cheap but inadequate public health system.

Saradamani Ray, whose 77-year old father is a patient at the NRS Medical College, said she would have to move him because of the strike.

“I will have to take my father somewhere else for his dialysis, maybe a private hospital,” she told Reuters.

“It will cause a lot of financial strain, but there’s nothing I can do. I will have to pay.”


@ Anttention Fresh,                
We work hard to ensure that any news brought to you is legitimate and valuable so we leave out the noise. This material, and other digital content on this website, may be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part BUT give us credit as your source. 

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