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Yet another Samsung phone allegedly exploded, but it’s not the Galaxy Note 7

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It has been bad news week after week for Samsung ever since the company began recalling exploding Galaxy Note 7 smartphones. Last week, the Korean giant recalled 2.8 million washing machines as they have a chance to also explode and now a woman in France says her Galaxy J5 exploded.

There is no recall yet and it is one of the first instances of this particular smartphone from Samsung to reportedly blow up.

Lamya Bouyirdane, the owner of the J5, says she noticed the J5 was sizzling hot after she asked her four-year-old to hand it to her — she then threw the phone away when she saw it swelling up with smoke coming out, according to the Associated Press. The phone caught fire and the back flew off.

Bouyirdane says she will sue the company. Samsung is in serious hot water if more J5 devices begin to explode — it already has to regain consumer trust in the safety of its devices to make sure its future products, like the Galaxy S8, will be a hit.

“We are unable to comment on this specific incident until we obtain and thoroughly examine the device,” a Samsung representative tells Digital Trends. “Customer safety remains our highest priority and we want to work with any customer who has experienced an issue with a Samsung product in order to investigate the matter and support them. The issues with the Galaxy Note 7 are isolated to only that model.”

The Galaxy J5 has been in the market and available for purchase for some time, so the chances of this explosion being a universal issue are low. Still, we will have to see what Samsung says after its investigation.

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24 Hours Across Africa

YouTube terminates Addy A-Game and Street Attraction channels

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Source: BBC -YouTube has crated two channels run by “pick-up artists” after a BBC investigation into the online industry.

It has removed hundreds of videos from accounts linked to Addy A-Game and Street Attraction for violating its rules on nudity and sexual conduct.

In September, Adnan Ahmed, who ran the Addy A-Game channel, was convicted of threatening and abusive behaviour towards young women.

Street Attraction’s coaches insist that they have done nothing wrong.

Adnan Ahmed, 38, was found guilty of five charges at Glasgow Sheriff Court.

Police began an investigation after his behaviour was revealed by the BBC’s The Social earlier this year.

Ahmed had secretly filmed himself approaching dozens of women in Glasgow and in Eastern Europe.

The investigation for Panorama and BBC Scotland’s Disclosure examined the global “game” business that claims to sell the secrets to picking up women.

It looked into channels that host videos of the sexual exploits of so-called pick-up artists, including what they claim are secret recordings of women having sex.

Addy Agame, aka Adnan AhmedImage captionAdnan Ahmed was found guilty of threatening and abusive behaviour

Reporter Myles Bonnar went undercover at a “bootcamp” run by Street Attraction, which claimed to teach techniques on seducing women such as overcoming “last minute resistance”.

Street Attraction’s founder Eddie Hitchens told the BBC that everything was “completely consensual”.

He said: “We actually help men…so if anything we help prevent rape culture to help prevent them get involved in anything illegal or non-consensual.”

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24 Hours Across Africa

Facebook suspends thousands of apps in response to Cambridge Analytica row

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Facebook Inc said, it has suspended tens of thousands of apps on the social networking platform, as part of the company’s ongoing app developer investigation it began in March 2018 in response to the Cambridge Analytica row.

The suspended apps are associated with about 400 developers, Facebook said, adding that it is not necessarily an indication that these apps were posing a threat to users.

Earlier this year, the company agreed to pay a record-breaking $5 billion fine to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to resolve a government probe into its privacy practices.

The FTC privacy probe was triggered last year by allegations that Facebook violated a 2012 consent decree and inappropriately shared information of 87 million users with British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook has since agreed to boost safeguards on user data and has put curbs on the amount of information that third-party developers can request from platform users.

“… We’re making progress. We won’t catch everything, and some of what we do catch will be with help from others outside Facebook,” the company said in a blogpost.

Source: Reuters

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