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Woman reveals how a passionate sex session could kill her

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A woman who was recently diagnosed with severe asthma has revealed how scared she is anytime she’s about to have sex. According to Callie-Anne Skevington, she knew she had to kill the sexual mood before it killed her after she found out that sex triggered the terrifying symptoms of a potentially deadly attack.

Callie-Anne Skevington

According to report, she said;  “I started wheezing loudly and felt like my chest was about to explode because I couldn’t get air out of my lungs,”. “I had to stop things and grab my reliever inhaler. It was such a turn-off and I was mortified. “We’d only just got married but the idea of having sex was suddenly terrifying.”

Callie, then 27, had lived a relatively normal life up till this point.

Although she had asthma – a respiratory condition that kills three people every day – she was able to keep it under control with medication.

Mum-of-two Callie – who has daughter aged 12 and a son of nine – was planning her wedding to Lee. She was also training to be a teacher. But by 2013, her symptoms were getting worse and harder to treat. “I’d only been hospitalized twice in 10 years – now it was 12 times in 10 months,” she says.

“I went from being energetic and busy to struggling to walk and talk some days. I had to give up my dancing and couldn’t work for the two months prior to our wedding in October 2013. Lee lost his job and we had to cancel our honeymoon. It was so stressful.”

Soon afterwards Callie was diagnosed with severe asthma – a condition which affects one in 20 asthma sufferers, and means symptoms can’t be controlled with the usual medications.

“It should have been the honeymoon period, where we couldn’t keep our hands off each other,” says Callie. “But I was housebound, isolated and reliant on Lee to care for our home and children. “High-dose steroid treatment that made me hungry, and the lack of exercise, meant I put on weight and became self-conscious and anxious.

“The asthma attack during sex was unnerving for both of us, especially as I was hospitalized the following day. We tried again a couple of weeks later but the same thing happened and I gave up initiating any intimacy.”

Struggling to enjoy sex is a hidden side effect of asthma, with many admitting that the condition directly affects their sex life.

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Newly high-tech weapon tested in North Korea

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North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has tested new ‘high-tech’ weapon in message to the US despite having an agreement with President Trump to denuclearized in the international summit, in June.



North Korea state media is yet to identify the kind of weapon that was launch.

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source report says, the picture the state media released showed Mr Kim surrounded by officials but no weapon was seen present.

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United State have reacted to the claim , adding that they are still hopeful with the promises made by president Trump and Chairman Kim will be fulfilled.

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Health & Lifestyle

Effects of Hot baths on inflammation, glucose metabolism

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According to new research, a hot bath could have effects that extend way beyond mental relaxation. According to the authors, regular hot baths might reduce inflammation and improve metabolism.

Over recent years, hot baths, saunas, and other so-called passive heating therapies have received growing attention from scientists.

Scientists now believe they offer some potential benefits, including improved vascular function and sleep.

Because hot baths are low cost and unlikely to cause significant side effects, understanding any benefits that a hot bath might have could be a quick win for medical science.



Recently, researchers set out to understand whether hot bath immersion could have an impact on metabolic disorders, such as diabetes.

 Almost 20 years ago, a paper concluded that hot water immersion of individuals with type 2 diabetes enhanced insulin sensitivity. However, it is still unclear how this might occur.

In the most recent study, the researchers dug a little deeper into the mechanisms at work. They theorized that the influence of a hot bath over glucose metabolism might revolve around the inflammatory response.

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Inflammation and insulin resistance

There is some evidence that chronic, low-level inflammation increases insulin resistance. In other words, inflammation reduces a cell’s ability to respond to insulin, potentially contributing to the development of diabetes.

Conversely, exercise has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity — meaning that the body has better control over glucose levels.

Although doctors often recommend exercise to reduce the risk of developing metabolic disorders, not everyone can exercise — perhaps due to health conditions or physical capacity. It is, therefore, essential to find alternative ways to improve insulin sensitivity for these people.

Exercise, as with other physical stressors, sparks a brief inflammatory response, followed by a more extended anti-inflammatory response. The researchers wanted to see if a different type of physical stressor — a hot bath — might have a similar effect on the immune system.

For this study, the researchers investigated the impact of a hot bath on overweight, mostly sedentary men. The findings were published recently in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

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Hot bath intervention

Each participant immersed themselves in a water bath set at 102°F (39°C) for 1 hour. Scientists took blood just before and after the bath, and then 2 hours later.

Also, the researchers charted the participants’ blood pressure, body temperature, and heart rate every 15 minutes.

 Over the following 2 weeks, the participants had a further 10 hot water immersions.

The researchers found that a single hot water immersion caused a spike of interleukin — a marker of inflammation. Similarly, there was an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production.

The spike in NO is important because it causes blood vessels to relax, lowering blood pressure. NO also improves glucose intake into tissues, and scientists think it has anti-inflammatory properties.



As expected, the 2-week intervention saw a reduction in fasting blood sugar and inflammation. In the same way that exercise influences inflammation, the researchers saw an initial increase followed by a long-term decrease in inflammation.

The researchers also write that it “might have implications for improving metabolic health in populations unable to meet the current physical activity recommendations.”

It is important to note that the people who took part in the study did report some discomfort. This was either due to the length of time that they were required to stay in the bath or the high temperature. Future research might investigate whether shorter periods or lower temperatures might have similar benefits.

Of course, hot baths alone cannot treat metabolic disorders, but they may be a simple, cost-effective intervention that can run alongside other treatments.

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