Connect with us

Health & Lifestyle

4 Effective, Natural ways to reduce sweating

Published

on

Sweating is the body’s natural way to lower your temperature. While exercise and sitting in a warm room causes increased sweating other conditions such as stress and tension can also cause such a reaction.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar acts as a natural deodorant because it destroys bacteria. It is enough to wipe your armpits once a day.

Using a dry cloth dipped in a mixture of vinegar and water in the ratio (2: 1) wipe the surfaces of the body, which sweat the most. Do this every night before bedtime.

FOLLOW US ON:
 INSTAGRAMLINKEDINYOUTUBETWITTER & FACEBOOK

Baking Soda

It is not expensive and you can buy it in any store in a commercial package, which you can carry in your purse. Therefore, it is very practical solution against perspiration and unpleasant smell of sweat. Add baking soda in a little water or with wet fingers apply on the armpits. Rub it into the skin and let it dry. Remove the excess with a dry paper towel.

Black tea

Tannin, which an acid contained in this tea, acts as a natural anti-prespirant that affects the glands and reduces excessive sweating. Bring some water to a boil, pour it into a mug and add 2 black teabags. Remove the bags from the water after one minute and let them cool on a saucer. Place them under the arms or in the area of the body where you often sweat, let them act for 5 minutes and remove.

Lemon

Lemons from time immemorial are used to control body odor, ie against increased sweating. Citric acid kills bacteria and acts as a natural deodorant, but after treating the skin with lemon, you should avoid sun exposure. Cut the lemon in half and rub your armpits with it. Leave for 15-30 minutes and wash the skin with cold water.

TO DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE NEWS APP CLICK HERE
WATCH RUSSIA 2018 HIGHLIGHTS HERE

24 Hours Across Africa

Zimbawe’s doctor goes missing after masterminding strike

Published

on

Fearless Zimbabwe’s minister of health has called on the government to address insecurity lapses that has lead to the disappearance Peter Magombeyi, the head of a doctor’s union, who disappeared on Saturday.

Fears are rising over the fate of Zimbabwe medical doctor Dr Peter Magombeyi after he sent a message to say he had been abducted in that country by unknown persons – apparently for demanding a “living wage”.

An AFP report earlier on Sunday quoted the Zimbabwe Hospital Doctor’s Association (ZHDA) as saying Magombeyi had not been heard from since he sent a WhatsApp message on Saturday night saying he had been “kidnapped by three men”.

Zimbabwe doctors, who earn a miserly equivalent of about R3 000 are on strike to press for better wages, equipment and medicines in state hospitals.

The ZHDA has reportedly accused state security forces of abducting the doctor because of his role in organising work stoppages.

This week some doctors said the death of deposed Robert Mugabe, 95, in a Singapore hospital on 6 September was an indication of how bad health services in Zimbabwe

“Dr Magombeyi’s crime is only to ask for a living wage for his profession. This is a reflection of the troubles born out of refusal to implement Political Reforms.”

The Zimbabwe government led by Emmerson Mnangagwa has not publicly commented on the doctor’s disappearance

Continue Reading

24 Hours Across Africa

Turkey: Group calls for immediate action against Femicide

Published

on

Emine Dirican, a beautician from Istanbul, tried to be a good wife. But her husband hated that she worked, that she socialized, even that she wanted to leave the house sometimes without him.

She tried to reason with him. He lashed out.

“One time, he tied me — my hands, my legs from the back, like you do to animals,” recalls Dirican, shuddering. “He beat me with a belt and said, ‘You’re going to listen to me, you’re going to obey whatever I say to you.’ “

She left him and moved in with her parents. In January, he showed up, full of remorse and insisting he had changed. She let him in.

In her mother’s kitchen, he grabbed her by the hair, threw her to the floor and pulled out a gun.

“He shot me,” she says. “Then he went back to my mom and he pulled the trigger again, but the gun was stuck. So he hit her head with the back of the gun.”

Her father, who was in another room in the house, heard the gunshots and ran over. Dirican almost bled to death after a bullet ripped through a main artery in one of her legs.

“I was telling my father, ‘Daddy, please, I don’t want to die.’ “

Femicide — killing women because of their gender — is a longstanding issue in Turkey. Nearly 300 women have been killed so far this year, according to the Istanbul-based advocacy group We Will Stop Femicide, which has been tracking gender-related deaths since Turkish authorities stopped doing so in 2009.

Source Npr news

Continue Reading

Facebook

Advertisement
Flag Counter
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2018 Anttention Media. All rights reserved