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WHO issues warning over fake antibiotics in East Africa

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Kenyans need to be vigilant against a fake antibiotic in circulation in the market, World Health Organization (WHO) has warned.

The WHO said that fake versions of Augmentin are in circulation in some pharmacies in Kenya. It also said they could be found in Uganda.

Augmentin is a common antibiotic used to treat a number of bacterial infections, and in Kenya it can easily be bought over the counter in pharmacies.

In a statement, the WHO says the packaging of the falsified product appears to be a close imitation of the genuine product manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).

GlaxoSmithKline has denied manufacturing the fake version, which tests found had none of the active ingredients.

The fake drugs, with a batch number 786627, were discovered through routine post-marketing surveillance, the WHO said.

It has asked anyone who may have consumed the medication to seek immediate advice from a qualified healthcare professional.

The Kenyan authorities have also released a statement urging people to be vigilant based on what the WHO has said.

This is the second WHO alert issued on fake Augmentin in Africa. The first was issued in March.

BBC

Health & Lifestyle

WHO accused Tanzania of hiding information on Ebola victims

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Ebola virus has cause major loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in Africa.

The number of cases has began to decline gradually, following the commitment of substantial international resources.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has rebuked Tanzania for failing to provide information about possible Ebola virus infections.

The WHO said it had learned of one suspected fatal case in Dar es Salaam and two others but, despite repeated requests, was given no information

Tanzania has said it has no suspected or confirmed cases.

The latest outbreak has killed more than 2,000 in eastern DR Congo, with Uganda battling to stop any spread.

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24 Hours Across Africa

Zimbawe’s doctor goes missing after masterminding strike

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Fearless Zimbabwe’s minister of health has called on the government to address insecurity lapses that has lead to the disappearance Peter Magombeyi, the head of a doctor’s union, who disappeared on Saturday.

Fears are rising over the fate of Zimbabwe medical doctor Dr Peter Magombeyi after he sent a message to say he had been abducted in that country by unknown persons – apparently for demanding a “living wage”.

An AFP report earlier on Sunday quoted the Zimbabwe Hospital Doctor’s Association (ZHDA) as saying Magombeyi had not been heard from since he sent a WhatsApp message on Saturday night saying he had been “kidnapped by three men”.

Zimbabwe doctors, who earn a miserly equivalent of about R3 000 are on strike to press for better wages, equipment and medicines in state hospitals.

The ZHDA has reportedly accused state security forces of abducting the doctor because of his role in organising work stoppages.

This week some doctors said the death of deposed Robert Mugabe, 95, in a Singapore hospital on 6 September was an indication of how bad health services in Zimbabwe

“Dr Magombeyi’s crime is only to ask for a living wage for his profession. This is a reflection of the troubles born out of refusal to implement Political Reforms.”

The Zimbabwe government led by Emmerson Mnangagwa has not publicly commented on the doctor’s disappearance

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